Vintage strobe light photographs are a beautiful ‘Anatomy of Motion’.

1954 by Harold Eugene Edgerton Diver Bert West flips backwards in a multiflash shot that lasted less than half a second. West engaged Harold E. Edgerton to assist him in preparing a manual for divers.

Bullet through the Apple, 1964 MIT professor Harold Edgerton invented the strobe flash in the 1930s and this is an example of his stroboscopic photography

Dr Strobe: the man who stopped time and electrified photography – in pictures

High-speed photographs by Lex Augusteijn capture the moment a bullet hits objects

High-speed photographs by Lex Augusteijn capture the moment a bullet hits objects

Lex Augusteijn is a Dutch photographer specialising in high-speed photography, capturing the moment a bullet hits objects such as light bulbs, water-filled ballons and drops of water.

Drummer Gene Krupa Playing Drum at Gjon Mili's Studio Premium Photographic Print by Gjon Mili at AllPosters.com

Drummer Gene Krupa Playing Drum at Gjon Mili's Studio

Drummer Gene Krupa Playing Drum at Gjon Mili's Studio Premium Photographic Print

Flowervases by Martin Klimas

These high-speed photos capture delicate flower vases shattering in mid-air. Shot by Martin Klimas, the photographer experiments with all kinds of creative materials to produce inventive compositions using high-speed photography.

[Bullet Cutting Through Playing Card] Harold Edgerton

Harold Edgerton: Bullet Cutting Through Playing Card, 1960

Google Image Result for http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/thisdayintech/2010/04/edgerton.jpg

April 6, 1903: Edgerton Born, Father of High-Speed Photography

Harold Edgerton revolutionized motion photography in 1931 by combining the camera with the stroboscope, capturing images in multiples of up to 600 &

Flowervases by Martin Klimas

German photographer Martin Klimas is known for his work surrounding high speed photography to capture moments otherwise invisible to the human eye.


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