More ideas from Tracey
Silkworm... While this is disgusting, I like the spiky things for texture...  Google Image Result for http://www.sciencephoto.com/image/371781/large/Z3550793-Silkworm,_SEM-SPL.jpg

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the head of a silkworm moth caterpillar (Bombyx mori). The silkworm uses its chewing mouthparts (upper centre) to feed on mulberry leaves.

Passion flower (Passiflora caerulea) pollen grain Science Image | 80200187 | Science Image from PSmicrographs

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a passion flower (Passiflora caerulea) pollen grain. Pollen grains are the male gametes (sex cells) of a plant. Magnification: when printed 10 centimetres wide. LOOKS LIKE A BASEBALL.

Tardigrade egg! (Water Bear)

Water bears (or tardigrades ) are tiny in.

Water bears (or tardigrades) are tiny invertebrates that live in aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats such as lichen and damp moss. Echiniscus granulatus is a herbivorous species that feeds on moss cells. Water bears are found throughout the world, including regions of extreme temperature, such as hot springs, and extreme pressure, such as deep underwater.

Water Bear Photograph - Water bears (or tardigrades) are tiny invertebrates that live in aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats such as lichen and damp moss. They require water to obtain oxygen by gas exchange.

Dictionaryhead.net is an radio show on NPR WQCS 88.9 that teaches vocabulary via a rhyming game. Learn what the word of the day means. Every Friday we have Science Head Friday where you will learn fascinating facts about the mysterious of science.

Tardigrade, also known as the "water bear." These long animals can survive some of the most extreme environmental conditions (including the vacuum of space) by going into a state of complete metabolic shut-down called cryptobiosis.

Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are some of the most fascinating animals in world

VIDEO: Tardigrade, Earth’s toughest animal. Survives frozen or boiled water and lives 200 years

Fossil -  Permian Period, 260 m - 42-23929798 - Rights Managed - Stock Photo

Fossil - Permian Period, 260 m - - Rights Managed - Stock Photo