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Eating the same old thing in your hiking food bag? Try some new trail snacks to shake things up and fuel your hard working body on a hike.

Outdoor Skill Eating the same old thing in your hiking food bag? Try some new trail snacks to shake things up and fuel your hard working body on a hike.

Remaining Daylight on Your Fingers - Cool tip for knowing how much daylight is left.

Determine remaining daylight on your hand. Use this simple trick to measure the remaining daylight without a watch. Count the finger widths between the sun and the horizon. Each finger is equivalent to 15 minutes, with each hand totaling an hour.

25 Reasons to carry a bandana, every day. Excellent thought starter on everyday bandana uses. The humble bandana is a classic piece of outdoor gear for a good reason. It is incredibly versatile! It's an essential item for camping, hiking, survival kits, fishing, and everyday carry. Sign up for our newsletter and get FREE SHIPPING on our awesome bandana collection.

25 Reasons to Carry a Bandana - The humble bandana is a classic piece of outdoor gear for a good reason. It is incredibly versatile! It's an essential item for camping, hiking, survival kits, fishing, and everyday carry.

Being a hot sweaty mess on the trail is no bueno. In my new blog post, I share my favorite hiking get-ups that help you stay dry and comfy no matter the conditions.

Not sure what to wear hiking? Learn how to dress for both function and comfort on the trail with this detailed hiking apparel guide.

Being a hot sweaty mess on the trail is no bueno. In my new blog post, I share my favorite hiking get-ups that help you stay dry and comfy no matter the conditions.

Not sure what to wear hiking? Learn how to dress for both function and comfort on the trail with this detailed hiking apparel guide.

1. Dig the fire chamber. Excavate a pit 1 foot in diameter and 1 foot deep. Now widen the base of the chamber a few inches so it has a juglike shape. This lets you burn larger pieces of wood.2. Dig the air tunnel. Start a foot away from the edge of the chamber, on the upwind side, and carve out a molelike tunnel 5 or 6 inches in diameter, angling down toward the base of the fire chamber.3. Build your fire in the chamber and top the hole with a grate or green saplings stout enough to hold a…

Native Americans used a Dakota fire hole to hide cooking fires from their enemies. Turns out that these small pits also consume less wood while burning.