Cotswold Hills. 1920. Paul Nash

Cotswold Hills -Your Paintings - Paul Nash paintings. This sums up the atmosphere of a landscape better for me than a more "realistic" painting.

Paul Nash - The Elms, 1911-12

An illustrated essay exploring the lives & careers of poet Edward Thomas and artist Paul Nash

PAUL NASH Winter Sea (1925-37) Have loved this ever since I saw it in York Art Gallery. The personification of the cold North Sea.

Paul Nash : 'Winter Sea' having lived in Aberdeen in the North East of Scotland I've loved this ever since I saw it in York Art Gallery. The personification of the cold North Sea.

Paul Nash - Landscape of the Moon's First Quarter

huariqueje: “ Landscape of the Moon’s First Quarter - Paul Nash , 1943 British, Oil on canvas, x cm ”

Paul Nash - Landscape of the Moon's Last Phase

Paul Nash - Landscape of the Moon's Last Phase The moon, simple abstract shapes, contrasts of light

A Howitzer Firing, 1918, by Paul Nash.; Paul Nash became one of the best-known British official war artists of the First World War. This painting highlights the role and power of artillery, which caused the majority of casualties during the conflict. The howitzers are disguised with camouflage netting and a biplane is just visible in the sky, emphasising the modern technology of war supplied by the industry of home. The painting is a modernist interpretation of a modern war.

A howitzer firing, 1918 by Paul Nash. Four British artillerymen, standing beneath a canopy of camouflage netting fire a howitzer gun.

Paul Nash, Existence, 1917Paul Nash was 25 at the outbreak of the First World War. He would come to see himself as a messenger to those who wanted the war to go on for ever, creating some of the most devastating landscapes of war ever painted, his outrage at the waste of life expressed through his depiction of the violation of nature in landscapes that were both visionary and terrifyingly realistic.

Paul Nash and World War One: ‘I am no longer an artist, I am a messenger to those who want the war to go on for ever… and may it burn their lousy souls’

Paul Nash, Existence, 1917Paul Nash was 25 at the outbreak of the First World War. He would come to see himself as a messenger to those who wanted the war to go on for ever, creating some of the most devastating landscapes of war ever painted, his outrage at the waste of life expressed through his depiction of the violation of nature in landscapes that were both visionary and terrifyingly realistic.

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