Loss of Face. The reformations iconoclasts deface idolatrous images

John Goto, Loss of Face; Iconoclasts, Zealots and Vandals

oil painting on panel, probably a section of a rood screen, c.1470-1490. It depicts the Virgin Mary, with smaller figures of Christ on the cross, a dove representing the holy spirit, and in a rayed border a figure of God the Father. the face and hands of the Virgin and these figures of the Three Persons of the Trinity have been gouged off, probably through iconoclasm. The kneeling figure of a grey friar is the donor.

The Annunciation (Painting)

oil painting on panel, probably a section of a rood screen, c.1470-1490. It depicts the Virgin Mary, with smaller figures of Christ on the cross, a dove representing the holy spirit, and in a rayed border a figure of God the Father. the face and hands of the Virgin and these figures of the Three Persons of the Trinity have been gouged off, probably through iconoclasm. The kneeling figure of a grey friar is the donor.

oil painting on panel, probably a section of a rood screen, c.1470-1490. It depicts the Virgin Mary, with smaller figures of Christ on the cross, a dove representing the holy spirit, and in a rayed border a figure of God the Father. the face and hands of the Virgin and these figures of the Three Persons of the Trinity have been gouged off, probably through iconoclasm. The kneeling figure of a grey friar is the donor.

The Annunciation (Painting)

oil painting on panel, probably a section of a rood screen, c.1470-1490. It depicts the Virgin Mary, with smaller figures of Christ on the cross, a dove representing the holy spirit, and in a rayed border a figure of God the Father. the face and hands of the Virgin and these figures of the Three Persons of the Trinity have been gouged off, probably through iconoclasm. The kneeling figure of a grey friar is the donor.

Part of a lost sequence known as the 'History of the Resurrection' this image of doubting Thomas is probably mid 14th century. It was discovered in 1846, in the north transept of Saint Albans Cathedral beneath whitewash.

Part of a lost sequence known as the 'History of the Resurrection' this image of doubting Thomas is probably mid century. It was discovered in in the north transept of Saint Albans Cathedral beneath whitewash.

Iconoclasm in Zurich, 1524.

Iconoclasm -The destruction of images or hostility toward visual representations in general. -Protestant mobs in many cities took down and smashed statues, stained-glass windows, and paintings

Exhibition Review: “Art Under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm”

Art under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm (Tate Britain, London)

From Icons to Idols (Documents on the Image Debate in Reformation England; BY David J. Davis; Imprint: Pickwick Publications). The debate over religious images was fundamental to the development of the Reformation. Even before the Reformation, iconoclasm and the critique of image devotion were marks of religious radicalism. Protestant reformers embraced iconoclasm as a means of condemning Catholic corruption and illustrating their war against idolatry. From Icons to Idols provides an...

From Icons to Idols (Documents on the Image Debate in Reformation England; BY David J. Davis; Imprint: Pickwick Publications). The debate over religious images was fundamental to the development of the Reformation. Even before the Reformation, iconoclasm and the critique of image devotion were marks of religious radicalism. Protestant reformers embraced iconoclasm as a means of condemning Catholic corruption and illustrating their war against idolatry. From Icons to Idols provides an...

Art under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm | Tate. See Pat Wilcox Reformation responses in Tudor Cheshire.

Art under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm past exhibition at Tate Britain exploring the history of attacks on art in Britain from the century to now.


More ideas
Carved cupboard front, mid 16th century, Welsh, displayed at Cotehele House, Cornwall. Includes religious imagery, various figures, heraldry and an inscription.

Carved cupboard front, mid 16th century, Welsh, displayed at Cotehele House, Cornwall. Includes religious imagery, various figures, heraldry and an inscription.

A chrismatory, c.1500, for keeping holy oils used in Roman Catholic ceremonies. The lid decorated with a symbol of the Lamb of God; the front with two griffins. It has three pewter phials; one marked with an `I' for oil of the sick (`oleum infirmorum') the second marked with a `C' for the chrism (consecrated oil used for annointing in sacred rites); the third marked with a dotted symbol, presumably for the `oleum sanctum' (for a Christian convert under instruction before baptism).

A Chrismatory for Holy Thursday - Finding Shakespeare

ballad, 1620?: http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu/ballad/20130/image

ballad, 1620?: http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu/ballad/20130/image

Images Front Picture Library Uk Dir 9 Fortean Times 4786 5

A witch bottle used to drive away evil spells has been found with all its contents.

A cupping glass used for blood letting. 17th century, in the collection of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

A cupping glass used for blood letting. century, in the collection of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

One of Thomas Trevelyon's manuscript miscellanies, c.1603. See: http://collation.folger.edu/2012/12/a-third-manuscript-by-thomas-trevelyontrevelian/

One of Thomas Trevelyon's manuscript miscellanies, c.1603. See: http://collation.folger.edu/2012/12/a-third-manuscript-by-thomas-trevelyontrevelian/

A wooden stool, of a kind described in the Tudor period as a 'Joint stool', because of the joinery involved. This example is from the 17th century and is in the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust collection.

A wooden stool, of a kind described in the Tudor period as a 'Joint stool', because of the joinery involved. This example is from the century and is in the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust collection.

A coin for curing the “King’s Evil”; the gold angel of Charles I, London (Tower mint), 1625-1649 The gold ‘angel’ was introduced in 1465 by Edward IV, and was called an angel because it shows the Archangel Michael on the obverse. On the reverse is a...

A coin for curing the “King’s Evil”; the gold angel of Charles I, London (Tower mint), The gold ‘angel’ was introduced in 1465 by Edward IV, and was called an angel because it shows the.

Some of the pins recovered from the site of the Rose Playhouse during archaeological excavations. Pins were used to hold clothing together in the Tudor period, presumably these came loose and fell out unnoticed during performances.

Some of the pins recovered from the site of the Rose Playhouse during archaeological excavations. Pins were used to hold clothing together in the Tudor period, presumably these came loose and fell out unnoticed during performances.

Pinterest
Search