Tintagel Castle, Cornwall, England. King Arthur's birth place. Amazingly beautiful place with incredible energy around it.

Tintagel Castle, Cornwall, England. King Arthur's birth place. Amazingly beautiful place with incredible energy around it.

Jamaica Inn hotel, Cornwall's legendary coaching house, immortalised in Daphne du Maurier's novel of the same name, has stood high on Bodmin Moor for over four centuries. We're still referred to by historians as Cornwall's most famous smuggling inn. These days we do welcome the more salubrious guest ... and the odd ghost! The Inn also includes a museum and gift shop as well as a restaurant and bar.

Jamaica Inn hotel, Cornwall's legendary coaching house, immortalised in Daphne du Maurier's novel of the same name, has stood high on Bodmin Moor for over four centuries. We're still referred to by historians as Cornwall's most famous smuggling inn. These days we do welcome the more salubrious guest ... and the odd ghost! The Inn also includes a museum and gift shop as well as a restaurant and bar.

The Jamaica Inn in Cornwall is reputed to be haunted by a highwayman, a murdered smuggler, a mother and child, and horses.

The Jamaica Inn in Cornwall is reputed to be haunted by a highwayman, a murdered smuggler, a mother and child, and horses.

Dame Daphne du Maurier was a British author and playwright. Many of her works have been adapted into films, including the novels Rebecca (which won the Best Picture Oscar in 1941) and Jamaica Inn and the short stories "The Birds" and "Don't Look Now". The first three were directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Dame Daphne du Maurier was a British author and playwright. Many of her works have been adapted into films, including the novels Rebecca (which won the Best Picture Oscar in 1941) and Jamaica Inn and the short stories "The Birds" and "Don't Look Now". The first three were directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Jamaica Inn at Bolventor near Bodmin in Cornwall. Built in 1750, this old coaching inn was the inspiration for Du Maurier's wonderful novel of the same name.

Jamaica Inn at Bolventor near Bodmin in Cornwall. Built in 1750, this old coaching inn was the inspiration for Du Maurier's wonderful novel of the same name.

Nine Maidens Stone Circle, Bodmin Moor. The local myth about the creation of the stones suggests that 9 maidens were turned into stone as punishment for dancing on a Sunday. The fiddler, a megalith some distance north, is said to be the petrified remains of the musician who played for the dancers. These petrifaction legends are often associated with stone circles, + is reflected in the folk names of some of the nearby sites, for example, The Hurlers + The Pipers.

Nine Maidens Stone Circle, Bodmin Moor. The local myth about the creation of the stones suggests that 9 maidens were turned into stone as punishment for dancing on a Sunday. The fiddler, a megalith some distance north, is said to be the petrified remains of the musician who played for the dancers. These petrifaction legends are often associated with stone circles, + is reflected in the folk names of some of the nearby sites, for example, The Hurlers + The Pipers.

Jamaica Inn, a coaching house in 1750 as a staging post for changing horses during stagecoach runs over the Bodmin Moor, Cornwall. Made famous as the setting for Daphne du Maurier's novel of the same name

Jamaica Inn, a coaching house in 1750 as a staging post for changing horses during stagecoach runs over the Bodmin Moor, Cornwall. Made famous as the setting for Daphne du Maurier's novel of the same name

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