Andrew Sutherland

Andrew Sutherland

Andrew Sutherland
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15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

Buy D'Addario Zyex Scale Medium Tension Single E String for Violin. D'Addario Zyex Violin String (Steel) - Medium - - E scale violin with a playing length of 13 inches tensionSteel core e string

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

15 • Treble Viol by an Anonymous maker, French, c1700

In England after 1600, small bass viols such as these began to displace larger consort instruments. Viols of this size remained dominant until the viola da gamba began to go out of fashion in the late eighteenth century (at which point many small bass viols were converted into cellos)

Most surviving viols signed by or attributed to John Rose were likely made by the younger of a father and son pair of luthiers who went by the same name, and who worked in Bridewell, London, in the sixteenth century

In England after 1600, small bass viols such as these began to displace larger consort instruments. Viols of this size remained dominant until the viola da gamba began to go out of fashion in the late eighteenth century (at which point many small bass viols were converted into cellos)

Most surviving viols signed by or attributed to John Rose were likely made by the younger of a father and son pair of luthiers who went by the same name, and who worked in Bridewell, London, in the sixteenth century

Stradivarius violin template

The name of Antonio Stradivari and the date, both written on the pattern, have been attributed to the hand of Count Ignazio Alessandro Cozio di Salabue the Italian collector who obtained it from Stradivari’s son, Paolo.