Gerard Berry
More ideas from Gerard
Overlooked at the time of Anne Boleyn's execution: HA, ceiling of Hampton Court Palace (now known as the Anne Boleyn Gateway), attached with a "lover's knot".

Henry ordered that anything to do with Anne Boleyn to do taken down. Overlooked at the time of Anne Boleyn's execution: HA, ceiling of Hampton Court Palace (now known as the Anne Boleyn Gateway), attached with a "lover's knot".

Catherine of Aragon's Badge. Katherine Aragon (1485-1536). Married Arthur Tudor in 1501. Widowed after 6 months. Betrothed to Henry in 1503. Married Henry VIII in 1509. Had one surviving child, Princess Mary who became Queen Mary I of England. Buried at Perterborough Abbey.

Catherine of Aragon's Badge. Katherine Aragon Married Arthur Tudor in Widowed after 6 months. Betrothed to Henry in Married Henry VIII in Had one surviving child, Princess Mary who became Queen Mary I of England.

Henry VIII's hawking glove. Early 16th century. Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

Henry VIII's hawking glove in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Note the Tudor rose on the wrist.

Hampton Court Rosy Cross for Faith and Devotion

Hampton Court Palace, built in 1514 by Thomas Wolsey, Roman Catholic cardinal, Archbishop of York, and Lord Chancellor.The Tudor Rose and Crown adorns t.

Tudor Garden at Hampton Court Palace, London, UK - The eight heraldic beasts have been painted and gilded with the correct heraldic colours of the period. The White Hart may have been derived from Richard II’s mother, Joan of Kent's badge of a hind. It was adopted as a Yorkist badge and is shown as a supporter of the arms of Edward V in the south aisle of St George’s Chapel, Windsor.

White Hart: The White Hart may have been derived from Richard II’s mother, Joan Holland’s badge of a hind. It was adopted as a Yorkist badge and is shown as a supporter of the arms of Edward V in the south aisle of St George’s Chapel, Windsor.

The eight Royal Beasts in the Tudor Garden have been painted (and gilded) with the correct heraldic colours of the period. The heraldic Panther is generally shown as “incensed”, with flames coming from its mouth and ears, which represents its fragrant breath. The flames induce all other animals to approach it; the Dragon alone retreats. The Panther is also usually shown with red and blue spots although there are early examples which are spotted with red, blue and gold.

The eight Royal Beasts in the Tudor Garden, Hampton Court Palace

The eight Royal Beasts in the Tudor Garden have been painted (and gilded) with the correct heraldic colours of the period. The black bull was used as a badge by Lionel Duke of Clarence, second son of Edward III, and ancestor of the Yorkist kings. It was the sinister heraldic supporter of the arms of England under Edwards IV and V and Richard III.

The black bull was used as a badge by Lionel Duke of Clarence second son of Edward III & ancestor of the Yorkist kings - it was the sinister heraldic supporter of the arms of England under Edwards IV & V & Richard III .