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"Political Candour; - i.e. - Coalition 'Resolutions' of June 14th 1805" by James Gillray. Charles James Fox makes a speech in the House of Commons; the Opposition benches are packed, while Pitt, on the extreme left, sits alone on the Treasury Bench. This is a very interesting print - see the British Museum page for an explanation of the political background.

"Political Candour; - i.e. - Coalition 'Resolutions' of June 14th 1805" by James Gillray. Charles James Fox makes a speech in the House of Commons; the Opposition benches are packed, while Pitt, on the extreme left, sits alone on the Treasury Bench. This is a very interesting print - see the British Museum page for an explanation of the political background.

"Argument against Feeling", published by E Jackson, c. 1785. Fox spanks Pitt with a birch rod while Pitt says, "This is a question of feeling not Argumnt". According to the British Museum, it is "Probably a satire on the successful opposition to Pitt by Fox in 1785 over the Scrutiny [...] and the Irish Propositions". Definitely one of the weirdest caricatures of Fox and Pitt I've seen :/

"Argument against Feeling", published by E Jackson, c. 1785. Fox spanks Pitt with a birch rod while Pitt says, "This is a question of feeling not Argumnt". According to the British Museum, it is "Probably a satire on the successful opposition to Pitt by Fox in 1785 over the Scrutiny [...] and the Irish Propositions". Definitely one of the weirdest caricatures of Fox and Pitt I've seen :/

Portrait of Mrs. Charles James Fox by Reynolds c.1775-80

Sir Joshua Reynolds, Portrait of Mrs. Charles James Fox, formally famed courtesan Elizabeth Armistead, c.

Charles James Fox (1749-1806) by Robert Dighton. Fox was one of the greatest orators of his time, and was Pitt's longtime political rival.

Charles James Fox by Robert Dighton. Fox was one of the greatest orators of his time, and was Pitt's longtime political rival.

Caricature satirising the relationship of Charles James Fox and Elizabeth Armistead, c. 18th century. Probably by Gillray.

A Gillray-esque satirical etching showing Charles Fox and Elizabeth Armistead as ‘the odd couple’.

"The Champion of the People" by Thomas Rowlandson (1784) in the Royal Collection, UK - From the curators' comments: "A hand-coloured print of Charles James Fox clad in armour as he fights the Pittite Hydra with a sword and 'shield of truth'. On right bands of English, Irish and East Indian supporters stand and kneel in alleigance. In the left of the background, a group of men representung foreign powers, dance around the 'Standard of Sedition'."

A hand-coloured print of Charles James Fox clad in armour as he fights the Hydra (representing the Kings attempt to influence Parliament) with a sword and.

Radical Paunch! Charles James Fox (1749–1806), 1782, by Sir Joshua Reynolds. Prominent Whig statesman whose parliamentary career spanned 38 years; particularly noted for being the arch-rival of William Pitt the Younger. Fox rose to prominence in the House of Commons as a forceful and eloquent speaker. Coming of the American War of Independence and the influence of the Whig Edmund Burke, Fox's opinions evolved into some of the most radical ever to be aired in the Parliament of his era.

Charles James Fox, a leader of the Whig Party in England, wore a blue suit in Parliament in support of George Washington and the American Revolution. Portrait by Joshua Reynolds

Charles James Fox - high whig and bon viveur

Charles James Fox, by Karl Anton Hickel. The son of Henry Fox and Lady Caroline Lennox, he was a radical politician - the nemesis of Pitt the Younger.

After a painting by Reynolds. "The young Etonian is as alive as ever on the canvas of one of Sir Joshua’s very best pictures. There he may be seen, smart, but rather untidy, in a blue laced coat, looking amazingly old for fourteen, with his jet-black curls, and his strongly moulded rounded features of a Jewish cast — if that nation could be associated with poor Charles Fox in any connection but one..."-- George Otto Trevelyan

Lady Sarah Lennox Charles James Fox and Suan Strangways-Fox Joshua Reynolds Sarah is leaning our the window Holland House

WARNING: Not recommended for people aged more than 4 (days)  I broke records in Loserdom with this poem I wrote. And I'm submitting it. For a graded assignment. *hangs head in shame and slinks out*

WARNING: Not recommended for people aged more than 4 (days) I broke records in Loserdom with this poem I wrote. And I'm submitting it. For a graded assignment. *hangs head in shame and slinks out*

Portrait of Charles James Fox (1749-1806), bust-length, in a blue coat. On 6 May 1774, he argued in the House of Commons, "To go at once, and establish a perfectly despotic government, contrary to the genius and spirit of the British constitution, carries with it the appearance of a love of despotism, and a settled design to enslave the people of America, very unbecoming this country.  My idea is, that America is not to be governed by force, but by affection and interest."

Portrait of Charles James Fox (1749-1806), bust-length, in a blue coat. On 6 May 1774, he argued in the House of Commons, "To go at once, and establish a perfectly despotic government, contrary to the genius and spirit of the British constitution, carries with it the appearance of a love of despotism, and a settled design to enslave the people of America, very unbecoming this country. My idea is, that America is not to be governed by force, but by affection and interest."

Fox leans back disconsolately in a low chair; in his right hand is an empty purse, in the left 'Pitts Speech'. Beside him in his upturned hat are a dice-box and dice. On the left Burke, stripped to the waist, kneels before his 3-legged stool on which is propped an open book inscribed 'Reform'; he is flagellating himself with a birch-rod, holds a rosary attached to a cross. Behind, as if seen in a camera obscura or through a window, North is embracing a young woman wearing tattered garments.

Frederick North, Earl of Guilford; Charles James Fox), by James Gillray (died published