Up until the 20th century, London was filled with squalid slums known as Rookeries. The most famous was in St Giles, though other Rookeries include Rosemary Lane and Jacob's Island in Bermondsey, where Dickens's Oliver Twist villain Bill Sykes meets his end.

Richard Guard's 'Lost London'

Up until the century, London was filled with squalid slums known as Rookeries. The most famous was in St Giles, though other Rookeries include Rosemary Lane and Jacob's Island in Bermondsey, where Dickens's Oliver Twist villain Bill Sykes meets his end.

The Bunch of Grapes, Limehouse. | 18 Vintage Photos Of Charles Dickens' London

18 Vintage Photos Of Charles Dickens' London

The Harbour Master's Office and The Grapes public house in Narrow Street, Limehouse, London.

The Saffron Hill Rookery where Dickens placed Fagins Den in the masterpiece that is Oliver Twist, London, 19th century.

The Saffron Hill Rookery where Dickens placed Fagins Den in the masterpiece that is Oliver Twist, London, century was the birthplace of a couple of my families

London, Clerkenwell, St John's Gate c.1870.

St John's Gate The historical Gentleman's Magazine was printed from offices here, so my fictional Gentleman's Periodical was printed nearby.

This woman's job was to wake people up to go to work. She was called a "Knocker Up". She waited until she knew the person was awake before moving on to the next person's house.

A knocker-up was a profession in England and Ireland, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up's job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time.

Love this picture - so pretty - http://www.londonvacationsguide.com/

London in Snow, Black and White. Can it get any better? In 2013 we had a London with snow. It was a wonderfull experience . We celebrated my husbands birthday in London.

London bus, 1920's.

The 1926 UK General Strike: An independent bus crammed with commuters at Ludgate Circus, London, during the General Strike, May 1926

Fore Street at the junction with Ferry Street, Lambeth, 1860. Janeways's Pottery on the left, Diamond Hall, formerly Bishop of Hereford's Palace on the right. Replaced by the Albert Embankment c 1868

Fore Street Lambeth - I read the early Cockney London books by Mary Jane Staples (I think that was a pen name for Reg Staples? This reminded me

The building with the canopy is Bridge House, George Row, Bermondsey, in 1926. Built around 1705 and demolished in 1950, the place was once surrounded by the Jacob's Island rookery.

[Wrong era, but great inspiration for Eva's book] The building with the canopy is Bridge House, George Row, Bermondsey, in Built around 1705 and demolished in the place was once surrounded by the Jacob's Island rookery.

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