Concrete Magazine

Concrete Magazine

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Camberley, Surrey, UK  ·  Concrete, the flagship monthly global magazine of The Concrete Society is devoted to the design, construction, technology and use of structural concrete.
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Photo of the month is Le Sac Trio by artist and designer Jamie Johnstone who completed   a masters course in material practice at the University of Edinburgh. During the course, he experimented extensively with concrete formwork, primarily in context with fabric mould-making.  The ‘Living Concrete’ collection of sculptures is part of a series exploring the organic shapes created by pouring concrete into fabric forms. Visit: www.jamiecjohnstone.com.

Photo of the month is Le Sac Trio by artist and designer Jamie Johnstone who completed a masters course in material practice at the University of Edinburgh. During the course, he experimented extensively with concrete formwork, primarily in context with fabric mould-making. The ‘Living Concrete’ collection of sculptures is part of a series exploring the organic shapes created by pouring concrete into fabric forms. Visit: www.jamiecjohnstone.com.

6a architects and Price & Myers were appointed by Juergen Teller Studio to design a new 500m2 studio for the artist on a narrow ex-industrial site in North Kensington, London. As well as studio space, the brief includes offices, archives, kitchen, library, small gym and sauna. William York of Price & Myers reports.

6a architects and Price & Myers were appointed by Juergen Teller Studio to design a new 500m2 studio for the artist on a narrow ex-industrial site in North Kensington, London. As well as studio space, the brief includes offices, archives, kitchen, library, small gym and sauna. William York of Price & Myers reports.

Digital processes in the construction industry are constantly evolving, with formwork design and management being a recent key area of growth. In ‘Formwork design and installation goes digital’, Ben Fentem of Trimble explores how formwork businesses can improve productivity.

Digital processes in the construction industry are constantly evolving, with formwork design and management being a recent key area of growth. In ‘Formwork design and installation goes digital’, Ben Fentem of Trimble explores how formwork businesses can improve productivity.

In ‘Savings set in concrete’, Lewis Evans of Mott MacDonald reports on how Grafham Water Treatment Works in Cambridgeshire has one of the largest precast service reservoirs in Europe. Its completion, using prefabrication techniques instead of traditional in-situ construction methods, was a more economical option for Anglian Water, as well as being better for the environment.

In ‘Savings set in concrete’, Lewis Evans of Mott MacDonald reports on how Grafham Water Treatment Works in Cambridgeshire has one of the largest precast service reservoirs in Europe. Its completion, using prefabrication techniques instead of traditional in-situ construction methods, was a more economical option for Anglian Water, as well as being better for the environment.

Twintec Projects recently completed pile-supported floor slabs for a new regional distribution centre (RDC) at Avonmouth for one of Europe’s leading food retailers to service the supermarket’s expanding operations in south-west England. In ‘Software-designed flooring’, Colin Shephard reports.

Twintec Projects recently completed pile-supported floor slabs for a new regional distribution centre (RDC) at Avonmouth for one of Europe’s leading food retailers to service the supermarket’s expanding operations in south-west England. In ‘Software-designed flooring’, Colin Shephard reports.

The areas in which self-compacting concrete (SCC) is used have increased considerably since it was developed in earthquake zones throughout Asia where structural columns attached to tall buildings were heavily congested with steel reinforcement. SCC was designed to flow around this type of reinforcement and provide a fully compacted, durable concrete to work in conjunction with steel. In ‘Self-compacting concrete – why use it?’ Peter Cowan of Sika Concrete & Waterproofing reports.

The areas in which self-compacting concrete (SCC) is used have increased considerably since it was developed in earthquake zones throughout Asia where structural columns attached to tall buildings were heavily congested with steel reinforcement. SCC was designed to flow around this type of reinforcement and provide a fully compacted, durable concrete to work in conjunction with steel. In ‘Self-compacting concrete – why use it?’ Peter Cowan of Sika Concrete & Waterproofing reports.

A new type of highly flowable concrete bridges the gap between conventional and self-compacting concrete in the UK. Kevin O’Gorman of GCP Applied Technologies reports in ‘Will my project benefit from control-flow concrete?’

A new type of highly flowable concrete bridges the gap between conventional and self-compacting concrete in the UK. Kevin O’Gorman of GCP Applied Technologies reports in ‘Will my project benefit from control-flow concrete?’

The Civil and Structural Engineering Degree programmes at Queen’s University Belfast reflect the cutting-edge research in concrete technology and structural innovations. Additionally, the strong track record in knowledge transfer partnerships (KTPs) with the precast concrete industry in Northern Ireland has led to a curriculum that meets the needs of industry in terms of work and knowledge-based learning. Su Taylor reports in ‘Embedding concrete knowledge’.

The Civil and Structural Engineering Degree programmes at Queen’s University Belfast reflect the cutting-edge research in concrete technology and structural innovations. Additionally, the strong track record in knowledge transfer partnerships (KTPs) with the precast concrete industry in Northern Ireland has led to a curriculum that meets the needs of industry in terms of work and knowledge-based learning. Su Taylor reports in ‘Embedding concrete knowledge’.

In ‘Meeting the demands of industry and employers’, Alan Richardson of Northumbria University explains why research and teaching around concrete is high on the agenda and how the university is working with leading industry representatives to ensure it plays its part in helping to produce the concrete engineers of the future.

In ‘Meeting the demands of industry and employers’, Alan Richardson of Northumbria University explains why research and teaching around concrete is high on the agenda and how the university is working with leading industry representatives to ensure it plays its part in helping to produce the concrete engineers of the future.

For over 30 years the Concrete Technology Unit (CTU) has been delivering concrete education as a key part of the University of Dundee’s Civil and Structural Engineering undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes. In ‘A concrete education’, Moray Newlands and Rod Jones of the University of Dundee report.

For over 30 years the Concrete Technology Unit (CTU) has been delivering concrete education as a key part of the University of Dundee’s Civil and Structural Engineering undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes. In ‘A concrete education’, Moray Newlands and Rod Jones of the University of Dundee report.

High-performance spray-repair concrete has been used to fortify the sea wall that acts as a coastal defence to Nothe Fort, Weymouth Harbour, Dorset. The Grade II listed fort was abandoned in 1956 and became derelict. Over the many decades of continuous exposure to sea water and tidal action, work to reinstate the concrete harbour wall became essential. Barry Ephgrave of Saint-Gobain Weber reports in ‘Repairing the sea wall at Nothe Fort, Weymouth Harbour’.

High-performance spray-repair concrete has been used to fortify the sea wall that acts as a coastal defence to Nothe Fort, Weymouth Harbour, Dorset. The Grade II listed fort was abandoned in 1956 and became derelict. Over the many decades of continuous exposure to sea water and tidal action, work to reinstate the concrete harbour wall became essential. Barry Ephgrave of Saint-Gobain Weber reports in ‘Repairing the sea wall at Nothe Fort, Weymouth Harbour’.

Can you cut holes in an unbonded post-tensioned concrete floor slab? Freyssinet was asked this question recently regarding a building that required the installation of a new lift core. In ‘Unbonded post-tensioned floor slabs’, Philip Watkins-Smith reports.

Can you cut holes in an unbonded post-tensioned concrete floor slab? Freyssinet was asked this question recently regarding a building that required the installation of a new lift core. In ‘Unbonded post-tensioned floor slabs’, Philip Watkins-Smith reports.

In ‘Northampton’s waterside campus showcases flexibility of post-tensioned slab solutions’, Dan Price of CCL discusses the post-tensioned slab design for the University of Northampton’s new Creative Hub and Learning Hub buildings.

In ‘Northampton’s waterside campus showcases flexibility of post-tensioned slab solutions’, Dan Price of CCL discusses the post-tensioned slab design for the University of Northampton’s new Creative Hub and Learning Hub buildings.

The structural design team working on the elevated sections of the All Aboard Florida project at Miami Station identified shear load connectors as a suitable solution for load transfer at transverse joint locations within the rail viaduct superstructure. However, they needed to ensure that the system would cope with stringent dynamic load conditions. Hervé Poveda of Ancon and the Meadow Burke engineering team explain in ‘Shear load connectors in rail viaduct superstructure – ‘All Aboard…

The structural design team working on the elevated sections of the All Aboard Florida project at Miami Station identified shear load connectors as a suitable solution for load transfer at transverse joint locations within the rail viaduct superstructure. However, they needed to ensure that the system would cope with stringent dynamic load conditions. Hervé Poveda of Ancon and the Meadow Burke engineering team explain in ‘Shear load connectors in rail viaduct superstructure – ‘All Aboard…

Standards and specifications abound in the world of construction. However, despite the important role they play, they sometimes give rise to confusion and misunderstandings that can result in a job being completed that is inferior, rather than outstanding. In ‘Why we should be taking a standard approach to concrete repairs’, Greg Astill of StoCretec looks at some of the ‘standard’ pitfalls that await the unwary.

Standards and specifications abound in the world of construction. However, despite the important role they play, they sometimes give rise to confusion and misunderstandings that can result in a job being completed that is inferior, rather than outstanding. In ‘Why we should be taking a standard approach to concrete repairs’, Greg Astill of StoCretec looks at some of the ‘standard’ pitfalls that await the unwary.