Hammersmith Bridge-London 1900. Love that little car or whatever they called it. How about the bus in the background too!!

A cyclist riding a penny farthing over Hammersmith Bridge, London. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) London in the Victorian Era

London in the 1920's: Telephone Engineer

England: London in the telephone engineer, 50 feet up. The engineer is attaching the main telephone cable to a new support wire, suspended between Maddox Street and Conduit Street in Mayfair.

Lovely atmospheric photograph of Waterloo Place, London in 1899 by the Belgian photographer Leonard Misonne

Waterloo Place, London in 1899 - by Belgian photographer Leonard Misonne - (vintage lady, old photo, victorian era)

Brighton Swimming Club 1853

Brighton Swimming Club 1853 Love the tall tall hats! Pretty racy for the time! What a hoot!

19th century Russian kerchief seller. Click for more 19th century Russian portraits of ordinary people

Russian Handkerchief Seller And I also absolutely love that beautiful picket fence behind her :)

Street gramophone player. London, 1920.

thru-the-tulips: “ A street gramophone in London. ” - thru-the-tulips: A street gramophone in

Fleet Street, 1894. Horses had not yet been replaced by cars.

Fleet Street, where the Fleet River once ran. In 1894 horses had not yet been replaced by cars.

1928: Men rescuing residents in Rotherhithe, south London, from a flood caused by the Thames breaking its banks.

65 Photos Spanning Two Centuries Of Flooding In Britain

65 Photos Spanning Two Centuries Of Flooding In Britain - Men rescuing residents in Rotherhithe, south London, from a flood caused by the Thames breaking its banks. These are all pretty inedible captures.

A Knocker-up was a profession in England before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. It was their job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time. They used a heavy stick to knock on the clients’ doors or a long and light stick, often made of bamboo, to reach windows on higher floors. Some of them used pea-shooters. The knocker-up would not leave a client’s window until sure that the client had been awoken.

A knocker-up was a profession in England and Ireland, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up's job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time.

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