RAF Guided Missile Fitters (S) of No 62 Squadron servicing a Bristol Bloodhound Mark 1 surface-to-air guided missile at RAF Woolfox Lodge, Rutland, a disused Second World War airfield, was a satellite base to the V-Force station RAF Cottesmore and close to the Thor station of RAF North Luffenham.

RAF-T RAF Guided Missile Fitters (S) of No 62 Squadron servicing a Bristol Bloodhound Mark 1 surface-to-air guided missile at RAF Woolfox Lodge Rutland

The Bristol Bloodhound SAM was intended to protect the V-bomber bases and other RAF assets from high altitude attack. None were ever fired in combat.

The Bristol Bloodhound SAM was intended to protect the V-bomber bases and other RAF assets from high altitude attack. None were ever fired in combat.

Lowering the Avro Blue Steel stand-off nuclear bomb from its conveyor vehicle to an awaiting 'dolly' to take the bomb to the Avro Vulcan B.2A. RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, home of No 617 Squadron.

Lowering the Avro Blue Steel stand-off nuclear bomb from its conveyor vehicle to an awaiting 'dolly' to take the bomb to the Avro Vulcan RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, home of No 617 Squadron.

Bloodhound missiles on their launch pads with Scorpian control radar to the rear at RAF Holmpton/Partington

Bloodhound missiles on their launch pads with Scorpian control radar to the rear at RAF Holmpton/Partington

Guided missile fitters check the launcher of a Bloodhound Mark 1 of 62 (SAM) Squadron at RAF Woolfox Lodge, 5 July 1961

In Cold War pictures, how the RAF has always been ready to face Russia

Bristol Ferranti - Bloodhound I missiles on their launchers at Royal Air Force Station, Watton, c. 1983

Bristol Ferranti - Bloodhound I missiles on their launchers at Royal Air Force Station, Watton, c.

A 'Thor' missile in 1961, which could have been launched within just 15 minutes...

In Cold War pictures, how the RAF has always been ready to face Russia

A 'Thor' missile in which could have been launched within just 15 minutes, in 1961

Three giant golf balls entirely in scale with the vast open landscape of the North York Moors. These 40-metre diameter geodesic domes (radomes) housing mechanical radar dishes were installed by RCA in 1962 at RAF Fylingdales, Snod Hill, North Yorkshire UK, as part of the USA's cold war Ballistic Missile Early Warning Station network. They were replaced in 1989-1992 with a tetrahedron (pyramid) structure.

Three giant golf balls entirely in scale with the vast open landscape of the…

The Bristol Bloodhound

Military Weapons, The Bristol, Bloodhound, Aeroplanes, British Army, Soviet Union, Cold War, Air Force, Rockets

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