Child workers in the industrial revolution.

Britain's child slaves: They started at 4am, lived off acorns and had nails put through their ears for shoddy work. Yet, says a new book, their misery helped forge Britain

Britain's child slaves: They started at lived off acorns and had nails put through their ears for shoddy work. - Childhood and Child Labour in The British Industrial Revolution by Professor Jane Humphries

ENGLISH TEA ROOMS: The Bridge Tea Rooms, Bradford-on-Avon, United Kingdom; photo by Rory Francis

The Bridge Tea Rooms, Bradford-on-Avon, United Kingdom; east out of Bath. After 3 miles take at Limpley Stoke towards Bradford on Avon for further 3 miles. In the centre of Bradford, take a right at the roundabout and go over bridge.

The old (floating) landing stage at the Pier Head as I remember it when we'd take a trip on the ferry

As kids mum use to take us the pier head for trips on the iris .and get some sally lun.if anyone remembers and sitting upstairs over the shops at the bus ternimus .

Children as young as six years old during the industrial revolution worked hard hours for little or no pay. Children sometimes worked up to 19 hours a day, with a one-hour total break. This was a little bit on the extreme, but it was not common for children who worked in factories to work 12-14 hours with the same minimal breaks

Urban Conditions of the British Poor in the 1800s

York, UK

Little Bettys Cafe / York / uk (by unicorn Stonegate York, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom. This used to be Taylors of York.

Soho street, 1935

A miserable looking woman selling hot chestnuts in a Soho street. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images).

The Grapes

The Grapes, Limehouse, England. An historic riverside pub dating from 1585 and still in business today.

Milk Maid and the Farm Hand, Whitby, North Yorkshire, Late 1800s

Old Pics Archive on

Milk Maid and the Farm Hand, Whitby, North Yorkshire, England - Late (If it weren't for English milk maids, we might not have had a small pox vaccination.

1875-1905

historicaltimes: “ London General Omnibus Corporation horse bus conductor in bowler hat and long jacket standing on the boarding platform of the bus. The conductor sports a Bell punch ticket machine.

Liverpool Home, Liverpool History, King John, Victorian Era, Family History, Golden Age, 19th Century, Chester, Police

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