Particle-based immunogens

Elevated understanding and respect for the relevance of the immune system in cancer development and therapy has led to increased development of immunotherapeutic regimens that target existing cancer cells and provide long-term immune surveillance and protection from cancer recurrence. Read this review here: http://www.dovepress.com/particle-platforms-for-cancer-immunotherapy-peer-reviewed-article-IJN
8 Pins82 Followers
Figure 2 (A and B) Cellular interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells. DCs were generated from mouse C57BL/6 bone marrow cells and introduced to T cells isolated from C57BL/6-Tg(TcraTcrb) mice. The DCs were pretreated with silicon particles carrying the ovalbumin peptide and Toll-like receptor 4 ligand prior to incubation with the T cells. (A) Pseudocolored scanning electron micrograph showing a red T cell and a blue DC.

Figure 2 (A and B) Cellular interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells. DCs were generated from mouse C57BL/6 bone marrow cells and introduced to T cells isolated from C57BL/6-Tg(TcraTcrb) mice. The DCs were pretreated with silicon particles carrying the ovalbumin peptide and Toll-like receptor 4 ligand prior to incubation with the T cells. (A) Pseudocolored scanning electron micrograph showing a red T cell and a blue DC.

Figure 1 (A–C) Schematic overview of particle-based vaccines. (A) Three particle prototypes used to create therapeutic vaccines include porous silicon microparticles, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles, and liposomes. Each type of particle has unique features that impact its function and loading capacity, but potential common attributes include danger signals, antigens, immunomodulatory agents, and targeting entities.

Figure 1 (A–C) Schematic overview of particle-based vaccines. (A) Three particle prototypes used to create therapeutic vaccines include porous silicon microparticles, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles, and liposomes. Each type of particle has unique features that impact its function and loading capacity, but potential common attributes include danger signals, antigens, immunomodulatory agents, and targeting entities.

Figure 1 (A–C) Schematic overview of particle-based vaccines. (B) Particle vaccines are either preloaded into dendritic cells (DCs) ex vivo or administered as free particles for in vivo uptake by antigen presenting cells (APCs). The size of the particle impacts its mode of transport to the lymph node, with large particles relying on cell-based trafficking and smaller nanoparticles independently entering the lymphatics.

Figure 1 (A–C) Schematic overview of particle-based vaccines. (B) Particle vaccines are either preloaded into dendritic cells (DCs) ex vivo or administered as free particles for in vivo uptake by antigen presenting cells (APCs). The size of the particle impacts its mode of transport to the lymph node, with large particles relying on cell-based trafficking and smaller nanoparticles independently entering the lymphatics.

Figure 1 (A–C) Schematic overview of particle-based vaccines. (C) DCs process and present antigens delivered by particles to T cells by means of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I or II pathways.

Figure 1 (A–C) Schematic overview of particle-based vaccines. (C) DCs process and present antigens delivered by particles to T cells by means of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I or II pathways.

Figure 2 (A and B) Cellular interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells. DCs were generated from mouse C57BL/6 bone marrow cells and introduced to T cells isolated from C57BL/6-Tg(TcraTcrb) mice. The DCs were pretreated with silicon particles carrying the ovalbumin peptide and Toll-like receptor 4 ligand prior to incubation with the T cells. (B) Transmission electron micrographs at 5000× and 10,000× magnification show adhesion between a T cell and DC.

Figure 2 (A and B) Cellular interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells. DCs were generated from mouse C57BL/6 bone marrow cells and introduced to T cells isolated from C57BL/6-Tg(TcraTcrb) mice. The DCs were pretreated with silicon particles carrying the ovalbumin peptide and Toll-like receptor 4 ligand prior to incubation with the T cells. (B) Transmission electron micrographs at 5000× and 10,000× magnification show adhesion between a T cell and DC.

Figure 3 (A and B) Pathogen-mimicking silicon microparticles. Scanning electron micrographs show mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, pseudocolored in green, with surface-bound bacteria (blue) and rod-shaped porous silicon microparticles (red). (A) Bacteria and silicon rods are shown together to emphasize size and shape similarities.

Figure 3 (A and B) Pathogen-mimicking silicon microparticles. Scanning electron micrographs show mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, pseudocolored in green, with surface-bound bacteria (blue) and rod-shaped porous silicon microparticles (red). (A) Bacteria and silicon rods are shown together to emphasize size and shape similarities.

Figure 3 (A and B) Pathogen-mimicking silicon microparticles. Scanning electron micrographs show mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, pseudocolored in green, with surface-bound bacteria (blue) and rod-shaped porous silicon microparticles (red). (B) Silicon rods (red) are shown with cellular pseudopodia wrapped across one of the particles.

Figure 3 (A and B) Pathogen-mimicking silicon microparticles. Scanning electron micrographs show mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, pseudocolored in green, with surface-bound bacteria (blue) and rod-shaped porous silicon microparticles (red). (B) Silicon rods (red) are shown with cellular pseudopodia wrapped across one of the particles.

Figure 4 (A–C) Hybrid particle platforms as therapeutic delivery vehicles. Discoidal porous silicon microparticles are shown in scanning electron micrographs loaded with 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). (A) Image captured using a FEI Nova NanoSEM using 100 kx magnification. (B and C) Images captured at 200 kx (B) and 450 kx (C) magnification using a Hitachi S-5500 scanning electron microscope.

Figure 4 (A–C) Hybrid particle platforms as therapeutic delivery vehicles. Discoidal porous silicon microparticles are shown in scanning electron micrographs loaded with 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). (A) Image captured using a FEI Nova NanoSEM using 100 kx magnification. (B and C) Images captured at 200 kx (B) and 450 kx (C) magnification using a Hitachi S-5500 scanning electron microscope.

Pinterest
Search