Figure in horizontal line

By placing lines at various distances from one another, the image gets more structure and gives the illusion of a body. A variation in width gives more dimension to the image and illustrates a sense of realism.

Illusions are always fun, which is why I am so fond of this photo. I really want to try to do this myself. It is so cool when my eyes shift back and forth from each perspective. I am so fascinated with this photo, mostly because I didn’t see the illusion at first.

Which of these two double-headed illusions do you think is best? Vote your choice by commenting below. In each image, which face did you see first? Face forward or face to the side?

Cut & paste by Damien Blottière. This image has be created in photoshop and I like the way the artist has got two images of the same person but fragmented them so they moderately fit together. I would like to use photoshop within this project to portray my theme.

Cut & Paste

Lines and shapes on paper and faces by Damien Blottiere Works by photographer Damien Blottière – Calvin Klein ‘Cut & Paste’ editorial for the December 2010 issue of Dazed & Confused.

hand cut photograph by Justine Khamara

Hand-Cut Photographs by Justine Khamara

Justine Khamara lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. She is a complex artist who works with digital manipulation. Khamara hand-cuts the photographs to reorganize and paste them afterwards. Same of her collages were even cut into thin strips then woven

Collages series between artist and graphic designer Boris Peianov and photographer Dan B.

Boris Peianov’s Illusions of a Silhouette

Alexi K, Cognitive Polygraph (Woman Disrobing), 2013 (Pen & Ink)

splashes-of-red: Alexi K, Cognitive Polygraph (Woman Disrobing), 2013 (Pen Ink) Featured here ~nice contour drawing

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