Emma Turk

Emma Turk

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Boy standing on washtub and drinking by kitchen sink. Kentucky, 1964. By William Gedney

William Gedney Boy standing on washtub and drinking by kitchen sink. Kentucky, From William Gedney Photographs and Writings Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library. Let's not forget, it's not that long ago.

The Appalachian Mountains held many secrets unknown to outsiders. The ways of healing were not from doctors and hospitals, but from the women who lived in the mountains and learned from their ancestors,  nature, and the Cherokee people.

Mary Faust standing next to large walking wheel, an umbrella swift, another woman seated at a spinning wheel with a distaff and a skein winder in front of her, and a man processing flax on a flax break with a counterbalance loom behind him.

The Walker sisters at home in Sevier County, Tennessee, c.1962 ~ Margaret Jane (seated) & Louisa Susan. The Walker farmstead was originally built & settled by 1870. The farm was placed on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places in 1976. It has since been restored & maintained by the Park Service in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (bottom pic). Wikipedia entry ~

The Walker sisters at home in Sevier County, Tennessee, ~ Margaret Jane (seated) & Louisa Susan. The Walker farmstead was originally built & settled by The farm was placed on the Nat'l Register of Historic Places in

Mary Foust was the daughter of Daniel Foust. She never left East Tennessee and lived to be around 100 years old. When President Teddy Roosevelt was visiting Tennessee she was considered the oldest living American at the time and he traveled to meet her and eat one of her home cooked meals. Mary was famous for living an unchanged lifestyle that was a living window into the past. Her loom is now in the "Museum of Appalachia" near where she once lived.

mary foust, daughter of daniel foust - never left east tennessee, lived to nearly 100 - visited by president teddy roosevelt - her loom is in the museum of appalachia