U.S. President Lyndon Johnson passes out some of the 72 pens he used to sign the civil rights bill in Washington D.C. on July 2, 1964.  From left standing are, Rep. Roland Libobati (D-Ill.), Rep. Peter Rodino (D-N.J.), Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Rep. Emmanuel Celler (D-N.Y.) and Whitney Young, executive director of the National Urban League.  (AP Photo) / Beaumont

U.S. President Lyndon Johnson passes out some of the 72 pens he used to sign the civil rights bill in Washington D.C. on July 2, 1964. From left standing are, Rep. Roland Libobati (D-Ill.), Rep. Peter Rodino (D-N.J.), Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Rep. Emmanuel Celler (D-N.Y.) and Whitney Young, executive director of the National Urban League. (AP Photo) / Beaumont

September 9,1957: CIVIL RIGHTS BILL  -   The Civil Rights Act of 1957 is proposed and signed into a law by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The bill was passed to protect the voting rights of all citizens. The goal was to encourage African-Americans and other minorities to exercise their civil rights and register to vote.

September 9,1957: CIVIL RIGHTS BILL - The Civil Rights Act of 1957 is proposed and signed into a law by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The bill was passed to protect the voting rights of all citizens. The goal was to encourage African-Americans and other minorities to exercise their civil rights and register to vote.

President Lyndon Johnson Signing the 1965 Civil Rights Bill, also known as the Voting Rights Act Photographic Print at AllPosters.com

President Lyndon Johnson Signing the 1965 Civil Rights Bill, also known as the Voting Rights Act. The law came seven months after Martin Luther King's Selma, Alabama campaign, which pressured Congress to pass the legislation.

During those twenty years Lyndon Johnson had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching.

During those twenty years Lyndon Johnson had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching.

All sizes | Robert Kennedy Retreats on Civil Rights Bill As Blacks Scream Sellout - Jet Magazine, October 31, 1963 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!...

Robert Kennedy Retreats on Civil Rights Bill As Blacks Scream Sellout - Jet Magazine, October 1963

The Michigan Department of Civil Rights filed a complaint Friday with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights, asking to ban the use of American Indian mascots and imagery in K-12 schools because it denies equal rights to American Indian students.

Tax issue leaves small businesses uneasy Proposed bills on remote collection divide retailers.

Huffington Post: March 17, 2015 - Civil rights bill top priority for LGBT voters, according to new poll

Civil Rights Bill Top Priority For LGBT Voters, According To New Poll

Huffington Post: March 2015 - Civil rights bill top priority for LGBT voters, according to new poll

Strom Thurmond.  Time has shown he was misguided, but he fought harder for what his constituents believed in than any other politician.

August 28 – United States Senator Strom Thurmond (D-SC) sets the record for the longest filibuster with his speech railing against a civil rights bill.

Looking Black On Today: In 1866 Black People Were Granted Citizenship When Congress Passed Civil Rights Bill of 1866

Black ThenLooking Black On Today: In 1866 Black People Were Granted Citizenship When Congress Passed Civil Rights Bill of 1866 - Black Then

Lyndon Johnson on the Civil Rights Act of 1964

President Lyndon Johnson - Remarks on Signing the Civil Rights Bill 50 yrs later.discrimnation is still going on.

President Johnson confronts Senator Richard Russell, the leader of the filibuster against the civil-rights bill. Photo by: Yoichi Okamoto/National Archives

How LBJ Saved the Civil Rights Act

How LBJ Saved the Civil Rights Act - Michael O'Donnell - The Atlantic > I had no idea.and I lived through those times, and they were so upsetting to see others suffer so much.

Also from Master of the Senate: Johnson’s voting record from 1937 to 1957 "had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching."

Also from Master of the Senate: Johnson’s voting record from 1937 to 1957 "had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching."

Stokely Carmichael quote black activist black history civil rights  I maintain that every civil rights bill in this country was passed for white people, not for black people. Stokely Carmichael

Stokely Carmichael quote black activist black history civil rights I maintain that every civil rights bill in this country was passed for white people, not for black people.

Sept. 91957, The same day Pres. Eisenhower is signing the 1957 Civil Rights bill civil rights activist and leader Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth is badly beaten in Birmingham,AL while trying to enroll his children in school.

Eisenhower is signing the 1957 Civil Rights bill civil rights activist and leader Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth is badly beaten in Birmingham,AL while trying to enroll his children in school.

Obama Signs Emmett Till Civil Rights Bill

President Barack Obama has signed a bill that allows the Justice Department and the FBI to reopen unsolved civil rights cases before

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