Martin Luther King and Malcolm X only met once, on March 26, 1964 when both were attending Senate hearings for the Civil Rights Bill. #TodayInBlackHistory

Rosa Parks and Dr Martin Luther King jr 1955 Civil Rights Leaders African American History Black & White Photography Photo Print

Gov. Matthew Welsh signs the 1963 Indiana Civil Rights Bill (S. 131) witnessed by sponsors (standing L-R) Marshall Kizer, Robert Rock, Robert Brokenburr, and L. Keith Bulen. Photo credit: Indiana Historical Society Digital Image Collections.

Matthew Welsh signs the 1963 Indiana Civil Rights Bill (S. witnessed by sponsors (standing L-R) Marshall Kizer, Robert Rock, Robert Brokenburr, and L.

During those twenty years Lyndon Johnson had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching.

Magnetic Persuasion – Naturally Use Elegant Language To Hypnotically Persuade and Influence

Know your constitutional rights.  And how they can be at risk.

Republicans are not holding up up the or the because of freedom FROM religion. and lack of hate speech laws. And wheres the "well regulated guns laws"?

Until the 1950s, signs like these were common markers of legally enforced laws of racial segregation in America. Racial segregation in the United States as a general term, included physical separation and provision of separate facilities, services, and opportunities such as housing, medical care, education, employment, and transportation along racial lines. Disgusting.

Not Your Grandparent's Brand of Racism

Until the signs like these were common markers of legally enforced laws of racial segregation in America. Racial segregation in the United States as a general term, included physical separation and provision of separate facilities, services, and op

John Lewis, a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who had planned to call the civil rights bill "too little, too late" at the 1963 March on Washington, shown on April 16, 1964. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News and World Report.

John Lewis, a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) who had planned to call the civil rights bill "too little, too late" at the 1963 March on Washington, shown on April Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, U.

Huffington Post: March 17, 2015 - Civil rights bill top priority for LGBT voters, according to new poll

Civil Rights Bill Top Priority For LGBT Voters, According To New Poll

Huffington Post: March 2015 - Civil rights bill top priority for LGBT voters, according to new poll

Also from Master of the Senate: Johnson’s voting record from 1937 to 1957 "had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching."

Also from Master of the Senate: Johnson’s voting record from 1937 to 1957 "had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching."

This hands-on Bill of Rights Sort is a fun way for students to learn about the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution. This activity includes the first ten amendments, their definition, and a description of each one.   Great to use as a center, formative assessment, independent activity, morning work, or homework.

Bill of Rights SORT

Born enslaved in 1847, John Roy Lynch eventually served as a U.S. Congressman from Mississippi from 1873 to 1877 and 1882-1883. Prior to his term in Congress he had served as Speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives. An active Republican, Lynch served in various Party capacities in Mississippi and Washington, D.C. until 1911. In 1912, he moved to Chicago where he practiced law until his death in 1939. The speech in the link is “Speech on the Civil Rights Bill” from 1875.

Congressman John R. Lynch, “Speech on the Civil Rights Bill”

Obama Signs Emmett Till Civil Rights Bill

The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture will celebrate Black influence in a two-hour ABC special.

The United States Constitution, Limited Government, States' Rights and The Tenth Amendment--Videos

The United States Constitution, Limited Government, States’ Rights and The Tenth Amendment–Videos

The United States Constitution, Limited Government, States' Rights and The Tenth Amendment. This is a picture with all the amendments. It's shows the laws and the rights of the people.

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