The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

Des guerres de religion à la mort d’Henri IV (1562-1610) | Musée virtuel du Protestantisme ... Edict of Nantes

Des guerres de religion à la mort d’Henri IV (1562-1610) | Musée virtuel du Protestantisme ... Edict of Nantes

A George III oak-cased eight-day longcase clock Peter Amyot, Norwich (1733 - 1799) Peter Amyot (1733 - 1799) was of French Huguenot descent. The first immigrant from his family, Thomas, came to England at the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 and settled in the parish of St Peter Mancroft in Norwich. Peter was a distinguished clock and watch maker, working first at White Lion Lane then at 19 Haymarket, and, newly in partnership with his apprentice James Bennett (1760 - 1845), at No.2…

A George III oak-cased eight-day longcase clock Peter Amyot, Norwich (1733 - 1799) Peter Amyot (1733 - 1799) was of French Huguenot descent. The first immigrant from his family, Thomas, came to England at the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 and settled in the parish of St Peter Mancroft in Norwich. Peter was a distinguished clock and watch maker, working first at White Lion Lane then at 19 Haymarket, and, newly in partnership with his apprentice James Bennett (1760 - 1845), at No.2…

Edict of Nantes The Edict of Nantes was the royal decree of Henry IV that ended the French Wars of Religion in In 1562 the mas.

Huguenot stamp~my Ancestors.  Andre Picon & Ester Jeanne Bonneau left La Rochelle, France during the Edict of Nantes.  Arriving in Scotland then to Ireland. Andre Picon held a position in the Court of King Louis XIV (King of France) : Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Huguenot stamp~my Ancestors. Andre Picon & Ester Jeanne Bonneau left La Rochelle, France during the Edict of Nantes. Arriving in Scotland then to Ireland. Andre Picon held a position in the Court of King Louis XIV (King of France) : Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Edict of Nantes, granting religious freedoms, commemorated at Chateau des Ducs de Bretagne in Nantes

Edict of Nantes, granting religious freedoms, commemorated at Chateau des Ducs de Bretagne in Nantes

French Wars of Religion - Between 2,000,000 and 4,000,000 people were killed  (both side  I guess )and at the conclusion of the conflict in 1598, Huguenots were granted substantial rights and freedoms by the Edict of Nantes, though it did not end hostility towards them. The wars weakened the authority of the monarchy, already fragile under the rule of Francis II and then Charles IX, though it later reaffirmed its role under Henry IV  see much more on the LINK or via Ann Wardley's 4 boards on…

French Wars of Religion - Between 2,000,000 and 4,000,000 people were killed (both side I guess )and at the conclusion of the conflict in 1598, Huguenots were granted substantial rights and freedoms by the Edict of Nantes, though it did not end hostility towards them. The wars weakened the authority of the monarchy, already fragile under the rule of Francis II and then Charles IX, though it later reaffirmed its role under Henry IV see much more on the LINK or via Ann Wardley's 4 boards on…

The Edict of Nantes (1598) Henry IV Henry IV  The edict which Henry IV promulgated in Nantes in 1598 offered the Reformed Protestants of France a relatively safe social life and limited freedom of worship.  It was intended to be perpetual, end the Wars of Religion for good and restore peace and internal order to France.  The edict was the written expression of a compromise between the Catholic religion of the state and the confession of a significant minority of the French population.

The Edict of Nantes (1598) Henry IV Henry IV The edict which Henry IV promulgated in Nantes in 1598 offered the Reformed Protestants of France a relatively safe social life and limited freedom of worship. It was intended to be perpetual, end the Wars of Religion for good and restore peace and internal order to France. The edict was the written expression of a compromise between the Catholic religion of the state and the confession of a significant minority of the French population.

Louis XIV revoking the Edict of Nantes

Louis XIV revoking the Edict of Nantes

in 1598 had hendrik IV het edict van nantes geschreven en daarmee hadden hugenoten het recht om hadden om hun geloof te behouden. Hierdoor ontstond godsdienstvrijheid in Frankrijk.

in 1598 had hendrik IV het edict van nantes geschreven en daarmee hadden hugenoten het recht om hadden om hun geloof te behouden. Hierdoor ontstond godsdienstvrijheid in Frankrijk.

Christianity -- Protestant Reformation France Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Christianity -- Protestant Reformation France Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

The Theology of the French Reformed Churches: From Henry IV to the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

The Theology of the French Reformed Churches: From Henry IV to the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

The Theology of the French Reformed Churches introduces us to the Huguenots of the seventeenth century. The period was an unusual one in which France boasted two state religions, Roman Catholic and Protestant, due to the protections afforded the latter b

The Edict of Union (1588) The Edict of Nantes was an edict of pacification, the last in a long line, since eight similar texts had preceded it (including six edicts and two treaties). Edicts of pacification were laws that took the form of orders; they were spread by means of letters patent addressed to all of the king's subjects, and they had to be formally registered in each of the country's parlements. The variety of solutions imagined by the king and his retinue needed these laws to…

The Edict of Union (1588) The Edict of Nantes was an edict of pacification, the last in a long line, since eight similar texts had preceded it (including six edicts and two treaties). Edicts of pacification were laws that took the form of orders; they were spread by means of letters patent addressed to all of the king's subjects, and they had to be formally registered in each of the country's parlements. The variety of solutions imagined by the king and his retinue needed these laws to…

Civil wars followed. On March 4, 1590, Prince Henry of Navarre led Huguenot forces against the Catholic League at the Battle of Ivry in Normandy, resulting in a decisive victory. Then, on April 13, 1598, as the newly crowned Henry IV, he issued the Edict of Nantes, which granted to the Huguenots toleration and liberty to worship in their own way. For a time, at least, there was more freedom for the Huguenots  more below

Civil wars followed. On March 4, 1590, Prince Henry of Navarre led Huguenot forces against the Catholic League at the Battle of Ivry in Normandy, resulting in a decisive victory. Then, on April 13, 1598, as the newly crowned Henry IV, he issued the Edict of Nantes, which granted to the Huguenots toleration and liberty to worship in their own way. For a time, at least, there was more freedom for the Huguenots more below

Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather.  Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain.  After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England.  From there,  Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather. Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain. After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England. From there, Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

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