The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic.

Simon De Charmes was a French refugee who came to settle in London in 1688. This was due to the overturning of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 by King Louis XIV of France. The Edict of Nantes was a law granting French Protestants the right to practice their religion without persecution from the state. When Louis XIV overturned it many Protestants had to leave the Catholic country and became refugees. He found work as a freeman for the London Clockmaker’s Company in 1691, around when he made this…

Simon De Charmes was a French refugee who came to settle in London in 1688. This was due to the overturning of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 by King Louis XIV of France. The Edict of Nantes was a law granting French Protestants the right to practice their religion without persecution from the state. When Louis XIV overturned it many Protestants had to leave the Catholic country and became refugees. He found work as a freeman for the London Clockmaker’s Company in 1691, around when he made this…

400th anniversary of the Edict of Nantes

Sello: anniversary of the Edict of Nantes (Francia) (French Revolution) Yt:FR 3383

Edict of Nantes: Henry IV wanted to heal the religious divisions that had torn France apart so in 1598 he issued this edict as a compromise between Catholics and Huguenots. This edict allowed Protestants the right to worship in 150 Protestant towns throughout France; the king gave the towns 180,000 ecus to support the maintenance of their military garrisons.

Edict of Nantes: Henry IV wanted to heal the religious divisions that had torn France apart so in 1598 he issued this edict as a compromise between Catholics and Huguenots. This edict allowed Protestants the right to worship in 150 Protestant towns throughout France; the king gave the towns 180,000 ecus to support the maintenance of their military garrisons.

The Edict of Nantes, signed by Henry IV in April, 1598, ended the Wars of Religion, and allowed the Huguenots some religious freedoms, including free exercise of their religion in 20 specified towns of France. The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in October, 1685, began anew persecution of the Huguenots, and hundreds of thousands of Huguenots fled France to other countries.

APRIL The Edict of Nantes, signed by Henry IV of France, ended the Wars of Religion, which had begun in The Edict allowed the Huguenots some religious freedoms.

Edict of Fontainebleau - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Louix XIV's revocation of the Edict of Nantes signified shifting religious struggles and resulted in the Huguenots in France losing their ability to freely worship.

Henri IV (1553-1610). The Edict of Nantes - 1598

Edict Of Nantes -Henry VI's willingness to sacrifice religious principles to political necessity saved France. -The Edict of Nantes granted liberty of conscience and liberty of public worship of Huguenots in 150 fortified towns. It was established in

Faberge was a Russian genius and artist who created these fabulous eggs of precious metals and jewels. The son of a Huguenot jeweler father and Danish mother, his parents fled France due to the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes and relocated to Livonia, a former part of Russia.  Now as some of you may know, despite the bloody, cursed history of Russia, they have always managed to produce painfully beautiful arts whether, music, ballet, or literature.

Faberge Wedding Inspiration

Faberge was a Russian genius and artist who created these fabulous eggs of precious metals and jewels.

One feature of the Huguenot movement in France was that it included an extremely large proportion of artisans and craftsmen. This worked do France's disadvantage when Huguenots were forced out of the country before and after the 1685 Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (ie., Huguenot Diaspora). But it was to the advantage of the rest of the world wherever Huguenots settled and brought their talents and skills

When the Huguenots fled France, they brought their artisanal talent and craftsmanship with them.

The history of the French, Walloon, Dutch and other foreign Protestant refugees settled in England from the reign of Henry VIII to the revocation of the Edict of Nantes; with notices of their trade and commerce, copious extracts from the registers, lists of the early settlers, ministers, &c., and an appendix containing copies of the charter of Edward VI, &c (1846)

The history of the French, Walloon, Dutch and other foreign Protestant refugees settled in England from the reign of Henry VIII to the revocation of the Edict of Nantes; with notices of their trade and commerce, copious extracts from the registers, lists of the early settlers, ministers, &c., and an appendix containing copies of the charter of Edward VI, &c (1846)

Charles La Trobe, by W. A. Hirschmann, 1851 of Australia  Charles Joseph La Trobe (1801-1875), superintendent and lieutenant-governor, was born on 20 March 1801 in London, the son of Christian La Trobe and his wife Hannah, née Sims. His family was of Huguenot origin. His great-great-grandfather, Henri Bonneval La Trobe, had left France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes to join the army of William of Orange and arrived in England in 1688 invalided out of the army he settled in…

Biography - Charles Joseph La Trobe - Australian Dictionary of Biography

Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV. As Huguenots, the majority of French watchmakers emigrated, in particular to England and Switzerland (Geneva) which stood out as the watchmaking capitals of Europe. Swiss history Second influx of Protestant refugees to Switzerland.

Louis receiving the Doge of Genoa at Versailles on the Bombardment of Genoa.(Reparation faite à Louis XIV par le Doge de mai 1685 by Claude Guy Halle,Versailles.) Duke of Chartres in red on the right;

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