The house of Attorney General Palmer after being bombed by anarchists in 1919

The house of Attorney General Palmer after being bombed by anarchists in 1919

The Foreign Assistance Act (Pub.L. 87–195, 75 Stat. 424-2, enacted 9/4/1961, 22 U.S.C. § 2151 et seq.) is a US Congressional Act reorganizing the structure of US foreign assistance programs, separating military from non-military aid, creating a new agency, the US Agency for International Development (USAID) to administer those non-military, economic assistance programs. Signed on 11/3/1961 by President Kennedy who issued Executive Order 10973, detailing the reorganization.  Wikipedia.

The Foreign Assistance Act (Pub.L. 87–195, 75 Stat. 424-2, enacted 9/4/1961, 22 U.S.C. § 2151 et seq.) is a US Congressional Act reorganizing the structure of US foreign assistance programs, separating military from non-military aid, creating a new agency, the US Agency for International Development (USAID) to administer those non-military, economic assistance programs. Signed on 11/3/1961 by President Kennedy who issued Executive Order 10973, detailing the reorganization. Wikipedia.

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http://pinterest.com/pin/7248049375124767/ http://pinterest.com/pin/7248049375124673/ http://pinterest.com/pin/7248049374812192/ http://pinterest.com/pin/7248049374392226/ http://pinterest.com/pin/7248049375124914/ http://pinterest.com/pin/7248049374230080/ http://pinterest.com/pin/95771929550425580/ http://pinterest.com/pin/7248049373862237/ http://pinterest.com/pin/7248049373595092/ Espionage Act of 1917 - Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Espionage_Act_of_1917

No One Is Safe under the Espionage Act of 1917 - The Future of Freedom Foundation

No One Is Safe under the Espionage Act of 1917 - The Future of Freedom Foundation

Espionage Act of 1917 May Have Been Violated By Donald Trump. How Will He Have Time To Help America When He Will Be In Court Explaining Away His Financial And Political Involvement With Russia | DR. DIANA DON'T PLAY

Espionage Act of 1917 May Have Been Violated By Donald Trump. How Will He Have Time To Help America When He Will Be In Court Explaining Away His Financial And Political Involvement With Russia | DR. DIANA DON'T PLAY

The Espionage Act of 1917 prohibited any means to attempt to interfere with military operations or interfere with the military in any way, or support U.S. enemies during the war. The Sedition Act of 1918 extended the Espionage Act to cover more offenses, such as the freedom to express their opinion on the government or war effort in a negative way. With such acts, you were not allowed to support opposing war efforts or speak or do anything about opposing the war.

The Espionage Act of 1917 prohibited any means to attempt to interfere with military operations or interfere with the military in any way, or support U.S. enemies during the war. The Sedition Act of 1918 extended the Espionage Act to cover more offenses, such as the freedom to express their opinion on the government or war effort in a negative way. With such acts, you were not allowed to support opposing war efforts or speak or do anything about opposing the war.

Unions grew very rapidly during the war but after a series of failed major strikes in steel, meatpacking and other industries, a long decade of decline weakened most unions and membership fell even as employment grew rapidly. Radical unionism virtually collapsed, in large part because of Federal repression during World War I by means of the Espionage Act of 1917 and the Sedition Act of 1918. The major unions supported the third party candidacy of Robert La Follette in 1924.

Unions grew very rapidly during the war but after a series of failed major strikes in steel, meatpacking and other industries, a long decade of decline weakened most unions and membership fell even as employment grew rapidly. Radical unionism virtually collapsed, in large part because of Federal repression during World War I by means of the Espionage Act of 1917 and the Sedition Act of 1918. The major unions supported the third party candidacy of Robert La Follette in 1924.

The Espionage Act of 1917, passed on June 15, 1917, might very well be considered one of the most controversial laws ever passed in American history. Critics note that its harsh tone is an affront to the Constitution of the United States. Others may state that the law was necessary to safeguard the nation during the largest war humanity had ever seen at that point of time in history.

The Espionage Act of 1917, passed on June 15, 1917, might very well be considered one of the most controversial laws ever passed in American history. Critics note that its harsh tone is an affront to the Constitution of the United States. Others may state that the law was necessary to safeguard the nation during the largest war humanity had ever seen at that point of time in history.

The families of political prisoners protest against the espionage act of 1917 outside the White House, Washington D.C., 1922

The families of political prisoners protest against the espionage act of 1917 outside the White House, Washington D.C., 1922

ESPIONAGE ACT: Passed by Congress during World War I, the Espionage Act of 1917 made it a crime to convey information intended to interfere with the war effort or promote the success of the nation's enemies. It was aimed at socialist and anti-war activists during the war, and was used extensively after the war during the first "Red Scare" -- a period of widespread public fear of communist influence and infiltration into American society fueled by labor violence and anarchist bombings.

ESPIONAGE ACT: Passed by Congress during World War I, the Espionage Act of 1917 made it a crime to convey information intended to interfere with the war effort or promote the success of the nation's enemies. It was aimed at socialist and anti-war activists during the war, and was used extensively after the war during the first "Red Scare" -- a period of widespread public fear of communist influence and infiltration into American society fueled by labor violence and anarchist bombings.

Members of the Women's Land Army with piglets, undated. Catalogue reference: MAF 59/3

Members of the Women's Land Army with piglets, undated. Catalogue reference: MAF 59/3

MVI 8554    Did Hillary Violate The Espionage Act Of 1917?   Absolutely!

MVI 8554 Did Hillary Violate The Espionage Act Of 1917? Absolutely!

Mata Hari, circa 1907. On July 25, 1917, the Paris dancer was sentenced to death for spying for Germany during World War I. Her exotic and provocative routines brought her fame across Europe, and her lovers included military and political figures from France and Germany. (Gamma-Keystone/Getty)

Mata Hari, circa 1907. On July 25, 1917, the Paris dancer was sentenced to death for spying for Germany during World War I. Her exotic and provocative routines brought her fame across Europe, and her lovers included military and political figures from France and Germany. (Gamma-Keystone/Getty)

CA17102a 100th anniversary of the Espionage Act (Eugene V. Debs (1855–1926), Arrested under the Espionage Act of 1917; J. Edgar Hoover (1895–1972) was the first Director of FBI and received additional authority from the 1917 Espionage Act; Thomas Woodrow Wilson 1856–1924. In 1915 he asked Congress for the legislation, which would later be known as Espionage Act; A.Mitchell Palmer, Wilson's Attorney General, believed communism was "eating its way into the homes of the American workman.")

CA17102a 100th anniversary of the Espionage Act (Eugene V. Debs (1855–1926), Arrested under the Espionage Act of 1917; J. Edgar Hoover (1895–1972) was the first Director of FBI and received additional authority from the 1917 Espionage Act; Thomas Woodrow Wilson 1856–1924. In 1915 he asked Congress for the legislation, which would later be known as Espionage Act; A.Mitchell Palmer, Wilson's Attorney General, believed communism was "eating its way into the homes of the American workman.")

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