Tribal Leaders Directory provides a tribes’ name, address, phone, and fax number for each of the 565 Federally-recognized Tribes.  There may be an email or website address listed for the tribal entity if they have provided it to the BIA.  Each tribe is listed in three sections, by the BIA region that provides services to them, the state they are located in, and in alphabetical order.  The Directory also provides information on the BIA Regions and agency offices.

The Bureau of Indian Affairs provides services directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts to 565 Federally recognized tribes within a government-to-government relationship.

How To Do Thanksgiving Makeup That Has Nothing To Do With The 566 Federally Recognized Tribes - YouTube

How To Do Thanksgiving Makeup That Has Nothing To Do With The 566 Federally Recognized Tribes - YouTube

List of federally recognized tribes by state - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of federally recognized tribes by state - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shoshone Warrior  Today, the Shoshone are still waiting to become a Federally recognized tribe, along with over 200 other Native American tribes such as the California Chumash and the North-Eastern Abenakis. from; http://www.shoshoneindian.com/

Shoshone Warrior Today, the Shoshone are still waiting to become a Federally recognized tribe, along with over 200 other Native American tribes such as the California Chumash and the North-Eastern Abenakis.

A Cherokee woman, undated photo (early 1900s?). Today, the Cherokee Nation is comprised of three separate federally recognized tribes, and is the largest. Originally one of the "Five Civilized Tribes", Cherokee were concentrated in the Southeastern US.

mystic-rose: “ snowyowlwhitecotton: Dawn Mist (aka Mary Daisy Norris-Gilham) the grandaughter of Running Crane - Blackfeet (Pikuni) - circa 1914 ”

Postcard Penobscot Indian with her Dog, Old Town, Maine.

Postcard Penobscot Indian with her Dog, Old Town, Maine.

Dear white people: As a Native who is enrolled in a federally recognized tribe, we don't care you're "1/64th Cherokee".

Someone from Jackson, Michigan, US posted a whisper, which reads "Dear white people: As a Native who is enrolled in a federally recognized tribe, we don't care you're Cherokee".

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