British Museum - The Battersea shield. Iron Age, c. 350–50 BC. Found in the River Thames, London, England. #Celts

British Museum - The Battersea shield. Iron Age, c. 350–50 BC. Found in the River Thames, London, England. #Celts

The main frame of the roundhouse would have been made of upright timbers, which were interwoven with coppiced wood - usually hazel, oak, ash or pollarded willow - to make wattle walls. This was then covered with a daub made from clay, soil, straw and animal manure that would weatherproof the house. The roof was constructed from large timbers and densely thatched.        All of the domestic life would have occurred within the roundhouse.

The main frame of the roundhouse would have been made of upright timbers, which were interwoven with coppiced wood - usually hazel, oak, ash or pollarded willow - to make wattle walls. This was then covered with a daub made from clay, soil, straw and animal manure that would weatherproof the house. The roof was constructed from large timbers and densely thatched. All of the domestic life would have occurred within the roundhouse.

Castell Henllys. "The Iron Age Celts' clothes might have looked like the tartan you see in Scotland and Ireland today, with checks and stripes. The Celts used berries and plants to dye the wool different colours."-BBC

Castell Henllys. "The Iron Age Celts' clothes might have looked like the tartan you see in Scotland and Ireland today, with checks and stripes. The Celts used berries and plants to dye the wool different colours."-BBC

The La Tène culture was a European Iron Age culture named after the archaeological site of La Tène on the north side of Neuenburgersee in Switzerland, where a rich cache of artifacts was discovered by Hansli Kopp in 1857. La Tène culture developed and flourished during the late Iron Age (from 450 BCE to the Roman conquest in the 1st century BCE) in Belgium, eastern France, Switzerland, Austria, Southern Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Hungary and Romania.

The La Tène culture was a European Iron Age culture named after the archaeological site of La Tène on the north side of Neuenburgersee in Switzerland, where a rich cache of artifacts was discovered by Hansli Kopp in 1857. La Tène culture developed and flourished during the late Iron Age (from 450 BCE to the Roman conquest in the 1st century BCE) in Belgium, eastern France, Switzerland, Austria, Southern Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Hungary and Romania.

Reproduction of Latgallian/Latgau Iron Age from Latvia. Baltic, not Norse/Viking or Slavic. jewelry woman - http://amzn.to/2iQZrK5

Reproduction of Latgallian/Latgau Iron Age from Latvia. Baltic, not Norse/Viking or Slavic. jewelry woman - http://amzn.to/2iQZrK5

Maiden Castle, Dorset, England  Maiden Castle, the largest and most complex Iron Age hill fort in Britain.

Maiden Castle, Dorset, England Maiden Castle, the largest and most complex Iron Age hill fort in Britain.

Celtic Clothing During the Iron Age- A Very Broad and Generic Approach | heather smith - Academia.edu

Celtic Clothing During the Iron Age- A Very Broad and Generic Approach | heather smith - Academia.edu

An Iron-Age Celtic roundhouse. Recreation of the interior and furnishings - Cornwall. Unique place to stay

Staying in a replica Iron Age roundhouse

An Iron-Age Celtic roundhouse. Recreation of the interior and furnishings - Cornwall. Unique place to stay

Iron Age house at Westhay    Reconstruction of an Iron Age house at the Peat Moors Centre, Westhay. The house is based on one found at the nearby Glastonbury Lake Village.

Iron Age house at Westhay Reconstruction of an Iron Age house at the Peat Moors Centre, Westhay. The house is based on one found at the nearby Glastonbury Lake Village.

This is a broch, a fortified home built during the Iron Age, some 2,100 years ago. Brochs, unique to Scotland, are dry-stone, twin-walled, round towers up to 30m across and 15m high. Part of a reproduction broch was built at Strathyre, Scotland by the West of Scotland Dry Walling Association using only tools used around 2000 years ago: A team of 20 spent five days constructing a 5m high section of the Dun Lubnaig Broch. Click through for details.

This is a broch, a fortified home built during the Iron Age, some 2,100 years ago. Brochs, unique to Scotland, are dry-stone, twin-walled, round towers up to 30m across and 15m high. Part of a reproduction broch was built at Strathyre, Scotland by the West of Scotland Dry Walling Association using only tools used around 2000 years ago: A team of 20 spent five days constructing a 5m high section of the Dun Lubnaig Broch. Click through for details.

Latgallian/Latgaļu from Iron Age Latvia. Metal reproductions by Daumants Kalniņš of Seno Rotu Kalve in Cēsis, Latvia. Modeled by his wife. The tunic sleeves were tucked into wide bronze spiral bracelets.

Latgallian/Latgaļu from Iron Age Latvia. Metal reproductions by Daumants Kalniņš of Seno Rotu Kalve in Cēsis, Latvia. Modeled by his wife. The tunic sleeves were tucked into wide bronze spiral bracelets.

824 gold staters found in a field near Wickham Market, Suffolk, (an area once on the southern fringe of Icenian territory, near its border with the Trinovantian tribal kingdom) . Almost all the coins were minted by royal predecessors of Boudicca made between 40BC and AD 15 - late iron Age

824 gold staters found in a field near Wickham Market, Suffolk, (an area once on the southern fringe of Icenian territory, near its border with the Trinovantian tribal kingdom) . Almost all the coins were minted by royal predecessors of Boudicca made between 40BC and AD 15 - late iron Age

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