Jimmie Lee Jackson (December 16, 1938[1][2]-February 26, 1965) was a civil rights activist in Marion, Alabama, and a deacon in the Baptist church. On February 18, 1965, he was beaten by troopers and shot by an Alabama State Trooper while participating in a peaceful voting rights march in his city. Jackson was unarmed; he died several days later in the hospital.  His death inspired the Selma to Montgomery marches in March 1965, a major event in the American Civil Rights Movement.

Jimmie Lee Jackson (December 16, 1938[1][2]-February 26, 1965) was a civil rights activist in Marion, Alabama, and a deacon in the Baptist church. On February 18, 1965, he was beaten by troopers and shot by an Alabama State Trooper while participating in a peaceful voting rights march in his city. Jackson was unarmed; he died several days later in the hospital. His death inspired the Selma to Montgomery marches in March 1965, a major event in the American Civil Rights Movement.

Jimmie Lee Jackson was a young, unarmed civil rights protestor who was shot by an Alabama State Trooper in 1965. Jackson’s death inspired the Selma to Montgomery marches, an important event in the American Civil Rights movement.

"Jimmie Lee Jackson was a young, unarmed civil rights protestor who was shot by an Alabama State Trooper in Jackson’s death inspired the Selma to Montgomery marches, an important event in the American Civil Rights movement." "Never Forget.

Jimmie Lee Jackson >>> 42 years later, the trooper who shot him was indicted.  He pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to 6 months in jail.

Jimmie Lee Jackson >>> 42 years later, the trooper who shot him was indicted. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to 6 months in jail.

1965  February 26, 1965 · Marion, Alabama Jimmie Lee Jackson was beaten and shot by state troopers as he tried to protect his grandfather and mother from a trooper attack on civil rights marchers. His death led to the Selma-Montgomery march and the eventual passage of the Voting Rights Act.

Jimmie Lee Jackson was beaten and shot by state troopers as he tried to protect his grandfather and mother from a trooper attack on civil rights marchers. His death led to the Selma-Montgomery march and the eventual passage of the Voting Rights Act.

A white former Alabama state trooper has pleaded guilty to killing a black civil rights worker 45 years ago at the height of the civil rights movement. Seventy-seven-year-old James Bonard Fowler was sentenced to six months in prison for the  1965 shooting of 26-year-old Jimmie Lee Jackson during a melee in a restaurant in Marion, Alabama. We speak to John Fleming, the reporter to whom Fowler first confessed, and Democratic Congress member John Lewis of Georgia, a leading figure of the civil…

45 Years Later, Former Alabama State Trooper Pleads Guilty to Killing Black Civil Rights Worker Jimmie Lee Jackson

Jimmie Lee Jackson was born Dec.16, 1938, in Marion, Ala. After fighting in the Vietnam War and spending time in Indiana, he returned to his hometown. There, he made about $6 a day as a laborer and woodcutter. He became a church deacon and fathered a daughter. Inspired by the Civil Rights Movement, he tried to vote for the first time. He made several attempts to register to vote, but never got past the many hurdles that had been set up to keep African Americans from casting ballots.

Jimmie Lee Jackson, an African-American who had served his country in Vietnam, was killed by an Alabama State Trooper who confessed to the killing

Jimmie Lee Jackson (December 16, 1938 – February 26, 1965)was a civil rights activist in Marion, Alabama, and a deacon in the Baptist church. On February 18, 1965, while participating in a peaceful voting rights march in his city, he was beaten by troopers and shot by Alabama State Trooper James Bonard Fowler. Jackson was unarmed and died eight days later in the hospital.

Jimmie Lee Jackson, whose murder by police, sparked a march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala.

Remembering Jimmie Lee Jackson, the First Martyr of the Selma Struggle

Hugh Stewart, a veteran of “Bloody Sunday,” remembers Jimmie Lee Jackson in Marion, Alabama.

45 years after the crime, James Bonard Fowler pled guilty to the  second-degree manslaughter of Jimmie Lee Jackson and was sentenced to 6 months in jail. Perry County commissioner, Albert Turner Jr, called the agreement “a slap in the face of the people of this county.” Fowler was released early aft...45 years after the crime, James Bonard Fowler pled guilty to the  second-degree manslaughter of Jimmie Lee Jackson and was sentenced to 6 months in jail. Perry County commissioner, Albert…

45 years after the crime, James Bonard Fowler pled guilty to the second-degree manslaughter of Jimmie Lee Jackson and was sentenced to 6 months in jail.

These people were murdered during the Selma voting rights campaign of 1965. Jimmie Lee Jackson, Viola Liuzzo, James Reeb and Jonathan Daniels represent the dozens of documented cases of American citizens who were attacked and killed for seeking to vote or helping others to vote. This is serious. Take the time today to exercise your right. It was not given freely. It was hard fought and deserves respect. #vote  via Ava DuVernay's instgram @ directher

These people were murdered during the Selma voting rights campaign of 1965. Jimmie Lee Jackson, Viola Liuzzo, James Reeb and Jonathan Daniels represent the dozens of documented cases of American citizens who were attacked and killed for seeking to vote or helping others to vote. This is serious. Take the time today to exercise your right. It was not given freely. It was hard fought and deserves respect. #vote via Ava DuVernay's instgram @ directher

Remember: Jimmie Lee Jackson

Remember: Jimmie Lee Jackson

SELMA BLOODY SELMA - A state trooper opened fire on Jimmie Lee Jackson, 26 — striking him in the midsection.

African-American civil rights movement (1954–1968) - Wikipedia

African-American civil rights movement (1954–1968) - Wikipedia

Jimmie Lee Jackson was a deacon of the St. James Baptist Church in Marion, Alabama, ordained in the summer of 1964. He was beaten and shot by state troopers as he tried to protect his grandfather and mother from a trooper attack on civil rights marchers. His death lead to the Selma-Montgomery march and the eventual...

Jimmie Lee Jackson was a deacon of the St. James Baptist Church in Marion, Alabama, ordained in the summer of 1964. He was beaten and shot by state troopers as he tried to protect his grandfather and mother from a trooper attack on civil rights marchers. His death lead to the Selma-Montgomery march and the eventual...

Jimmie Lee Jackson: The Death That Gave Life to Voting Rights | Peter J. Ognibene

Jimmie Lee Jackson: The Death That Gave Life to Voting Rights

Jimmie Lee Jackson’s family in Anniston says reopening the case means justice for them

is a man of the earth, a farmer down in the soil scrabbling and scratching with honesty to earn a place more for his family

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