Mildred loving

In 1967, Mildred Loving and her husband Richard successfully defeated Virginia's ban on interracial marriage via a famed Supreme Court ruling that had nationwide implications.

In Mildred Loving and her husband Richard successfully defeated Virginia& ban on interracial marriage via a famed Supreme Court ruling that had nationwide implications.

Struggle: Mildred (center) and Richard Loving (left), with their daughter, on the front steps of the home of Richard Loving's mother (standing at right) in Central Point, Caroline County, Virginia, May 1965

The love story that changed history: Fascinating photographs of interracial marriage at a time when it was banned in 16 states

A beautiful and inspirational family --> The love story that changed history: Fascinating photographs of interracial marriage at a time when it was banned in 16 states.

Just 45 years ago, 16 states deemed marriages between two people of different races illegal.    But in 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court considered the case of Richard Perry Loving, who was white, and his wife, Mildred Loving, of African American and Native American descent.    The case changed history - and was captured on film by LIFE photographer Grey Villet.

The love story that changed history: Fascinating photographs of interracial marriage at a time when it was banned in 16 states

Richard Mildred Loving, the couple in the landmark interracial marriage Supreme Court ruling Loving v.

Before June of 1967, sixteen states still prohibited interracial marriage, including Virginia, the home of Richard Perry Loving, a white man, and his wife, Mildred Loving, a woman of African-American and Native-American descent. Nine years prior, in June 1958, the couple traveled to Washington, D.C....Before June of 1967, sixteen states still prohibited interracial marriage, including Virginia, the home of Richard Perry Loving, a white man, and his wife, Mildred Loving, a woman of…

This Couple Overturned the Ban on Interracial Marriage in the South

Richard and Mildred Loving at home in 1965  two years before winning their landmark case in the Supreme Court which determined that all laws against interracial marriage in the U.S. were unconstitutional. [1485x1000] http://ift.tt/2f39Noa

Richard and Mildred Loving at home in 1965 two years before winning their landmark case in the Supreme Court which determined that all laws against interracial marriage in the U.

On March 18, 1966, LIFE magazine published a feature under the quietly chilling headline, “The Crime of Being Married.” The article, illustrated with photographs by LIFE’s Grey Villet, told the story of Richard and Mildred Loving, a married interracial couple battling Virginia’s anti-miscegenation laws.

Richard & Mildred Loving, a married interracial couple in the whose case "Loving v. Virginia" (note: the greatest court case name ever.) went to the Supreme Court. Click the pic to read their story.

Loving vs. Virginia -  Written in blank verse, the story of Mildred Loving, an African American girl, and Richard Loving, a Caucasian boy, who challenge the Virginia law forbidding interracial marriages in the 1950s.

Loving vs. Virginia - Written in blank verse, the story of Mildred Loving, an African American girl, and Richard Loving, a Caucasian boy, who challenge the Virginia law forbidding interracial marriages in the 1950s.

1967. Depois de nove anos proibidos de pisar em seu próprio estado, a Virgínia, por serem um branco e uma negra formando um casal, finalmente Richard e Mildred Loving viram a Suprema Corte dos Estados Unidos reverter a decisão e definir que casamentos inter-raciais não poderiam ser proibidos em nenhum lugar do país. A confusão jurídica começou em 1958, quando os dois viajaram até Washington para se casar, já que a cerimônia não seria permitida na Virgínia (nem em outros 15 estados do sul dos…

1967. Depois de nove anos proibidos de pisar em seu próprio estado, a Virgínia, por serem um branco e uma negra formando um casal, finalmente Richard e Mildred Loving viram a Suprema Corte dos Estados Unidos reverter a decisão e definir que casamentos inter-raciais não poderiam ser proibidos em nenhum lugar do país. A confusão jurídica começou em 1958, quando os dois viajaram até Washington para se casar, já que a cerimônia não seria permitida na Virgínia (nem em outros 15 estados do sul dos…

Content: The Loving's children Peggy, Sidney and Donald play in King and Queen County, Virginia in April 1965

The love story that changed history: Fascinating photographs of interracial marriage at a time when it was banned in 16 states

Greg Villet captures the Loving's children Peggy, Sidney and Donald as they play in Virginia in April 1965

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