Native American Raven legend

A similar story is told by the Southern Utes, and my father told it to me several times after having worked medicine with them. I know it by heart. ❤️<<<Ravens and Crows always were some of my favorite creatures of the Earth.

Wendigo Sketches by Beltaguise.deviantart.com on @deviantART

Wendigo: A cannibalistic monster in Northern Native American folklore, particularly stemming from the Ojibwe and Cree. A human can become a Wendigo when they consume human flesh, or when a Wendigo overtakes them.

The Wendigo. A creature from the mythology of Native Americans that lived in the region of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. It's born from pure cannibalism, and its hunger is never satisfied.

The Wendigo

The Wendigo. A creature from the mythology of Native Americans that lived in the region of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. It's born from pure cannibalism, and its hunger is never satisfied.

The Thunderbird is a legendary creature in North American Native history and culture.It is considered a Supernatural bird of power and strength.  Crunchyroll - Mythical Creatures Club - Group Info

The Thunderbird is a legendary creature in North American indigenous peoples' history and culture. It's considered a "supernatural" bird of power and strength.

Sky Woman Iroquois Native American Mythology 11x14 fine art print

(White Buffalo Calf Woman is) Sky Woman Iroquois Native American Mythology by MoonSpiralart/ Tammy Mae Moon

The Spider Woman is a common character in the Native American mythology. She is a powerful female deity and a bit of a trickster, but is usually helpful toward mankind. She is often portrayed as being from the first world, the realm of spirits and gods. Her significance can be noted in tales from the Hopi and Navaho tribes. In various traditions, it is believed that she often came to the aid of the Southwest tribes by weaving light, and is believed to have taught the Navajo people to weave.

The Spider Woman is a common character in the Native American mythology. She is…

Wohpe(meteor)- White Buffalo Calf Woman, who braught the pipe of peace ... Lakota goddess of peace & knowledge

Goddess Wohpe

north american indian trickster myths; coyote - Google Search

A visual representation of Coyote. He is often considered the Trickster of Native American folklore and mythology, though sometimes he is also a hero or antihero.

According to Iroquois legends, flying heads (or Kanontsistonties) are disembodied, winged heads, hungry for any human in their path. But their hunger can never be satiated; because they have no body, they’re destined to hunt for blood eternally. The origins of the flying heads vary greatly. Some legends state that those who practiced cannibalism became flying heads as punishment for their horrific behavior. (So, innocents are punished for the sinner's deed? How very... religious.)

According to Iroquois legends, flying heads (or Kanontsistonties) are disembodied, winged heads, hungry for any human in their path. But their hunger can never be satiated; because they have no body, they’re destined to hunt for blood eternally. The origins of the flying heads vary greatly. Some legends state that those who practiced cannibalism became flying heads as punishment for their horrific behavior. (So, innocents are punished for the sinner's deed? How very... religious.)

Atahensic is an Iroquois Sky Goddess that fell to the earth at the time of creation. She was carried down to the land by the wings of birds. After Her fall from the sky She gave birth to Earth Mother. Atahensic is associated with Marriage, Childbirth, and Feminine Endeavours. From Her lifeless body grew maize as a gift to mankind.

Atahensic is an Iroquois Sky Goddess that fell to the earth at the time of creation. She was carried down to the land by the wings of birds.

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