San Andreas fault, a continental transform fault that runs a length of roughly 810 miles (1,300 km) through California in the United States. The fault's motion is right-lateral strike-slip (horizontal motion). It forms the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate.

San Andreas fault (patahan), Earth's biggest transform plate boundary Transform occur where plates slide or, perhaps grind past each other along transform faults.

The crack that divides East from West. On one side is the North American Plate, on the other is the Eurasian Plate.

Iceland Offers Rare Glimpse of Tectonic Meeting Place

The North American Plate pulling away from the Eurasian Plate forming the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at Almannagjá, Iceland.

The crack that divides East from West. On one side is the North American Plate, on the other is the Eurasian Plate. Credit: Kate Ramsayer/AGU.

Iceland Offers Rare Glimpse of Tectonic Meeting Place

Iceland Offers Rare Glimpse of Tectonic Meeting Place

Earthquakes Progress Across Whole North American Plate In One Week’s Time

This is what I consider to be a breakthrough finding that professionals need to make note of immediately. Earthquakes are now progressing across the North American plate, literally traversing the e…

Tectonic Plate Rift    That's the North American plate on the left, and the European-Asian plate on the right.

Tectonic Plate Rift That's the North American plate on the left, and the European-Asian plate on the right.

The boundary between the Eurasian and American plates, Iceland

The boundary between Eurasian & American plates, Iceland

The continental divide at Thingvellir National Park in Iceland is the only place in the world where you can hold two continental plates at once: the North American plate on one side, the Eurasian plate on the other.

The Wonder List with Bill Weir

For years, scientists believed the mighty San Andreas—the 800-mile-long fault running the length of California where the Pacific and North American plates meet—could only rupture in isolated sections.

Earthquakes: Reckoning with 'The Big One' in California-and it just got bigger

For years, scientists believed the mighty San Andreas—the fault running the length of California where the Pacific and North American plates meet—could only rupture in isolated sections.

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