Odin's symbol is the the Valknut, the symbol for creation, preservation, and destruction. "I know that I hung on a windy tree nine long nights, wounded with a spear, dedicated to Odin, myself to myself, on that tree of which no man knows from where its roots run." (Odin in the Havamal, a collection of Old Norse poems from the Viking age).

Odin's symbol is the the Valknut, the symbol for creation, preservation, and destruction. "I know that I hung on a windy tree nine long nights, wounded with a spear, dedicated to Odin, myself to myself, on that tree of which no man knows from where its roots run." (Odin in the Havamal, a collection of Old Norse poems from the Viking age).

The Viking Life--nothing happens unless you work at it. #persistence #Fortitude #VikingWisdom

The Viking Life--nothing happens unless you work at it. #persistence #Fortitude #VikingWisdom

The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. Along with Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda is the most important extant source on Norse mythology and Germanic heroic legends.

The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. Along with Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda is the most important extant source on Norse mythology and Germanic heroic legends.

Eir ("mercy") is a Norse Goddess of Healing. She knew the secret powers of herbs, with which she could even resurrect the dead. Patroness of shadow workers, called on against sickness or injury. She gives both physical and psychic means of healing; shamanic healing, especially, falls into her realm. Eir is a companion of the goddess Frigga.

Eir ("mercy") is a Norse Goddess of Healing. She knew the secret powers of herbs, with which she could even resurrect the dead. Patroness of shadow workers, called on against sickness or injury. She gives both physical and psychic means of healing; shamanic healing, especially, falls into her realm. Eir is a companion of the goddess Frigga.

HEIMSKRINGLA is an online collection of Old Norse source material, primarily Eddas, Icelandic sagas, scaldic poetry, and some background material.

HEIMSKRINGLA is an online collection of Old Norse source material, primarily Eddas, Icelandic sagas, scaldic poetry, and some background material.

*/\Wolf Folklore/\* In Norse mythology, Sköll (Old Norse "Treachery") is a wolf that chases the horses Árvakr and Alsviðr, that drag the chariot which contains the sun (Sól) through the sky every day, trying to eat her. Sköll has a brother, Hati, who chases Máni, the moon. At Ragnarök, both Sköll and Hati will succeed in their quests.

*/\Wolf Folklore/\* In Norse mythology, Sköll (Old Norse "Treachery") is a wolf that chases the horses Árvakr and Alsviðr, that drag the chariot which contains the sun (Sól) through the sky every day, trying to eat her. Sköll has a brother, Hati, who chases Máni, the moon. At Ragnarök, both Sköll and Hati will succeed in their quests.

Old Norse Map of the Viking World "The geographical range of Viking exploration between the 9th and 12th centuries AD was amazing. From their Northern European homelands in today’s Norway, Denmark and Sweden they used the Norwegian and Baltic Seas to engage with the world " Clicking on the map enlarges it - you could go from the 768 X 364 size up to a 5039 X 2413 monster! All the placenames are in Old Norse. or English.  Going in Ancient History and

Old Norse Map of the Viking World "The geographical range of Viking exploration between the 9th and 12th centuries AD was amazing. From their Northern European homelands in today’s Norway, Denmark and Sweden they used the Norwegian and Baltic Seas to engage with the world " Clicking on the map enlarges it - you could go from the 768 X 364 size up to a 5039 X 2413 monster! All the placenames are in Old Norse. or English. Going in Ancient History and

In Norse mythology, svartálfar (Old Norse "black elves", singular svartálfr) are beings who dwell in Svartálf[a]heimr (anglicized as Svartalfheim, "home of black-elves").[1] Both the svartálfar and Svartálfaheimr are primarily attested in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Scholars have noted that the svartálfar appear to be synonymous with dwarfs and potentially also the dökkálfar (Old Norse "dark elves").

In Norse mythology, svartálfar (Old Norse "black elves", singular svartálfr) are beings who dwell in Svartálf[a]heimr (anglicized as Svartalfheim, "home of black-elves").[1] Both the svartálfar and Svartálfaheimr are primarily attested in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Scholars have noted that the svartálfar appear to be synonymous with dwarfs and potentially also the dökkálfar (Old Norse "dark elves").

Berserkers were Norse warriors who are primarily reported in the Old Norse literature to have fought in a nearly uncontrollable, trance-like fury, Berserkers are attested to in numerous Old Norse sources. The Úlfhéðnar (singular Úlfheðinn), another term associated with berserkers, were said to wear the pelt of a wolf when they entered battle. Úlfhéðnar are sometimes described as Odin's special warriors. Odin’s men went without their mailcoats and were mad as hounds or wolves and bit their…

Berserkers were Norse warriors who are primarily reported in the Old Norse literature to have fought in a nearly uncontrollable, trance-like fury, Berserkers are attested to in numerous Old Norse sources. The Úlfhéðnar (singular Úlfheðinn), another term associated with berserkers, were said to wear the pelt of a wolf when they entered battle. Úlfhéðnar are sometimes described as Odin's special warriors. Odin’s men went without their mailcoats and were mad as hounds or wolves and bit their…

Authentic Viking Art | Old Norse Designs Celtic and old norse designs

Authentic Viking Art | Old Norse Designs Celtic and old norse designs

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