D-Day Landing Sites Then And Now: 11 Striking Images That Bring The Past And Present Together

11 Striking Images That Show D-Day Landing Sites Then and Now

reinforcements land on Omaha beach during the Normandy D-Day landings near Vierville sur Mer, France, on June (REUTERS/US National Archives)

Omaha Beach - 67 years after landing

Areas of Invasion The Allied code names for the beaches along the stretch of Normandy coast targeted for landing were; Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword. Omaha was the costliest beach in terms of Allied casualties.

American soldiers on the way to Omaha Beach, 1944

American soldiers on the way to Omaha Beach, 1944 [402x513]

American soldiers on the way to Omaha Beach, 1944 -- look how young, just kids

70 years today. God bless the brave boys and men that went head first into France

France - Normandy - Omaha Beach , D- Day 6 June, 1944

Omaha Beach: dead soldiers of the 3rd Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, 6 june 1944.

Omaha Beach: dead soldiers of the Battalion, Infantry Regiment, Infantry Division, 6 june

D-Day Landing Sites Then And Now: 11 Striking Images That Bring The Past And Present Together - Tourists walk by where the body of a dead German soldier once lay in the main square of Place Du Marche in Trevieres after the town was taken by US troops who landed at nearby Omaha Beach in 1944.

11 Striking Images That Show D-Day Landing Sites Then and Now

D-Day Landing Sites Then And Now: 11 Striking Images That Bring The Past And Present Together. A great visual to drive home the point that think war is a wonderful way to boost stagnate economies

Omaha Beach, Normandy coast of France... today.

Omaha Beach, Normandy coast of France.

Pointe du Hoc was the highest point between Utah and Omaha beach during WWII. The German army fortified it with casemates and gun pits to prevent the Allied Forces from invading. American troops captured Pointe du Hoc, helping to win the battle. Today, some of the observation bunkers still stand.

Pointe du Hoc on the Normandy coast was the site of German fortifications defending Omaha Beach and Utah Beach during Operation Overlord on D-Day.

On this day in 1944, Virginia’s 116th infantry led the assault on Omaha Beach as part of Operation Overlord, commonly known as D-Day. More than 5,300 ships and 11,000 planes landed on the beaches of Normandy as the United States entered the war. Take a minute today to remember and honor those who fought and lost their lives on that day.

On this day in 1944, Virginia’s 116th infantry led the assault on Omaha Beach as part of Operation Overlord, commonly known as D-Day. More than 5,300 ships and 11,000 planes landed on the beaches of Normandy as the United States entered the war. Take a minute today to remember and honor those who fought and lost their lives on that day.

Soldiers of the 16th Infantry Regiment, wounded while storming Omaha Beach, wait by the chalk cliffs for evacuation to a field hospital for treatment. (Photo: US Army/Flickr

Remembering D-Day in 18 Photos

D-Day: The Normandy Invasion. Soldiers of the Infantry Regiment, wounded while storming Omaha Beach, wait by the chalk cliffs for evacuation to a field hospital for treatment, D-Day, June www.mil/d-day

Omaha Beach, France---I was completely and utterly blown away by Normandy, and it's surreal to think of D-Day taking place here. Visited 6/08. Thank you, vets!

Omaha Beach, France---I was completely and utterly blown away by Normandy, and it's surreal to think of D-Day taking place here

It’s Peaceful Today, But It Was The Site Of A Desperate Battle In WW2 – Omaha Beach

It’s Peaceful Today, But It Was The Site Of A Desperate Battle In WW2 – Omaha Beach

Then and now... Omaha Beach (© Normandy WW2 Then & Now)

Then and now. Omaha Beach (© Normandy Then & Now)

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