The omnipotence paradox refers to the apparently paradoxical ability of an omnipotent entity to both limit its powers and remain omnipotent. The paradox is used both as an argument against an omnipotent God and against the concept of true omnipotence.

Stone Free

The omnipotence paradox refers to the apparently paradoxical ability of an omnipotent entity to both limit its powers and remain omnipotent. The paradox is used both as an argument against an omnipotent God and against the concept of true omnipotence.

The omnipotence paradox refers to the apparently paradoxical ability of an omnipotent entity to both limit its powers and remain omnipotent. The paradox is used both as an argument against an omnipotent God and against the concept of true omnipotence.

The omnipotence paradox refers to the apparently paradoxical ability of an omnipotent entity to both limit its powers and remain omnipotent. The paradox is used both as an argument against an omnipotent God and against the concept of true omnipotence.

MIND BLOWING omnipotence paradox  #omnipotence, #paradox, #IMPOSSIBLITIES, #soitgoeson, #omniscient, #philosophy, #deepthinker, #MINDBLOWN

MIND BLOWING omnipotence paradox #omnipotence, #paradox, #IMPOSSIBLITIES, #soitgoeson, #omniscient, #philosophy, #deepthinker, #MINDBLOWN

When Homer is stoned and talks to Ned Flanders he cites his own example of the Omnipotence paradox: "Could Jesus microwave a burrito so hot that he himself could not eat it?"

Weekend at Burnsie's

When Homer is stoned and talks to Ned Flanders he cites his own example of the Omnipotence paradox: "Could Jesus microwave a burrito so hot that he himself could not eat it?"

The 10 Most MIND-TWISTING Paradoxes of All Time! | The Fortean Slip

The 10 Most MIND-TWISTING Paradoxes of All Time! | The Fortean Slip

Epicurus & The Art of Leading Change | Mainak Dhar | LinkedIn

Epicurus & The Art of Leading Change | Mainak Dhar | LinkedIn

"Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent.   Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent.   Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?   Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?"  - Epicurus

"Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?" - Epicurus

Dan Brown - "Omnipotent-benevolent simply means that God is all-powerful and well-meaning.''I...". god, religion, faith, paradox, benevolence, omnipotence

Dan Brown - "Omnipotent-benevolent simply means that God is all-powerful and well-meaning.''I...". god, religion, faith, paradox, benevolence, omnipotence

Just One Absurd Dogma: God is unable to take away evil without taking away free will? I must have misunderstood the definition of omnipotent. Judaism's view of Jesus: Jesus is viewed as having been the most influential and, consequently, the most damaging of all false messiahs. Einstein on the Abrahamic idolatries: The worship of false gods such as Yahweh (Allah and Elohim) is not only “unworthy, but also fatal", with "incalculable harm to human progress."

The destructive myth about religion that Americans disproportionately believe

Just One Absurd Dogma: God is unable to take away evil without taking away free will? I must have misunderstood the definition of omnipotent. Judaism's view of Jesus: Jesus is viewed as having been the most influential and, consequently, the most damaging of all false messiahs. Einstein on the Abrahamic idolatries: The worship of false gods such as Yahweh (Allah and Elohim) is not only “unworthy, but also fatal", with "incalculable harm to human progress."

Hitchens' razor is a law in epistemology (philosophical razor), which states that the burden of proof or onus in a debate lies with the claim-maker, and if he or she does not meet it, the opponent does not need to argue against the unfounded claim.

Hitchens' razor is a law in epistemology (philosophical razor), which states that the burden of proof or onus in a debate lies with the claim-maker, and if he or she does not meet it, the opponent does not need to argue against the unfounded claim.

Pinterest
Search