Fritz Strassmann

In 1938 Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, and Fritz Strassmann became the first to recognize that the uranium atom, when bombarded by neutrons, actually split.

Otto Hahn, OBE, (8 March 1879 – 28 July 1968) was a German chemist and pioneer in the fields of radioactivity and radiochemistry who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1944 for the discovery of nuclear fission. He is regarded as one of the most significant chemists of all time, and, especially as "the father of nuclear chemistry".

Otto Hahn, Chemistry-Professor in Berlin, helped Jewish scientists to escape and prevent them from deportation, assisted by his wife Edith Hahn, who had for years collected food for Jews hiding in Berlin.

Lise Meitner -- In collaboration with Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman, became first to recognize uranium atom actually split when bombarded by neutrons. (Chemical Heritage Foundation)

Lise Meitner -- In collaboration with Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman, became first to recognize uranium atom actually split when bombarded by neutrons.

Otto Hahn

Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, and Fritz Strassmann

Otto Hahn (8 March 1879 – 28 July 1968) was a German chemist and pioneer in the fields of radioactivity and  radiochemistry. He was awarded the 1944 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of nuclear fission.

Otto Hahn, OBE, ForMemRS March 1879 – 28 July was a German chemist and was awarded the 1944 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lise_Meitner Lise Meitner (Viena, 17 de noviembre de 1878 - Cambridge, 27 de octubre de 1968) fue una física austriaca que investigó la radiactividad y física nuclear. Meitner formó parte del equipo que descubrió la fisión nuclear, un logro por el cual su colega Otto Hahn recibió el Premio Nobel. Es a menudo considerada uno de los más evidentes ejemplos de hallazgos científicos hechos por mujeres y pasados por alto por el comité del Nobel.

Lise Meitner was an Austrian, later Swedish, physicist who worked on radioactivity and nuclear physics. Meitner was part of the team that discovered nuclear fission, an achievement for which her colleague Otto Hahn was awarded the Nobel Prize.

Otto Hahn

Otto Hahn

Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn in their laboratory.

Scientific discoveries and inventions women made that were credited to men. Photo is of Lise Meitner, nuclear fission

Lise Meitner's Devastating Letter to Otto Hahn

Lise Meitner's Devastating Letter to Otto Hahn

Scientist 2 includes : Carl Sagan, Sally Ride, Otto Hahn, Gugliemo Marconi, Stephen Hawking, Gordon Moore, James Watt, Bill Nye, Garrett Morgan and Jane Goodall

Scientist 2 includes : Carl Sagan, Sally Ride, Otto Hahn, Gugliemo Marconi, Stephen Hawking, Gordon Moore, James Watt, Bill Nye, Garrett Morgan and Jane Goodall

20 Scientist pack includes Scientist 1 includes  Tesla, Alexander Bell, Edison, Darwin, Franklin, Banneker, Faraday, Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, Curie  and Scientist 2 includes : Carl Sagan, Sally Ride, Otto Hahn, Gugliemo Marconi, Stephen Hawking, Gordon Moore, James Watt, Bill Nye, Garrett Morgan and Jane Goodall

20 Scientist pack includes Scientist 1 includes Tesla, Alexander Bell, Edison, Darwin, Franklin, Banneker, Faraday, Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, Curie and Scientist 2 includes : Carl Sagan, Sally Ride, Otto Hahn, Gugliemo Marconi, Stephen Hawking, Gordon Moore, James Watt, Bill Nye, Garrett Morgan and Jane Goodall

Otto Hahn's

Otto Hahn's cientista que descobriu a fissao nuclear

Otto Hahn |  Biography Online

Otto Hahn | Biography Online

Otto Hahn, ForMemRS was a German chemist and Nobel laureate in 1944, a pioneer in the fields of radioactivity and radiochemistry. He is regarded as "the father of nuclear chemistry".  Hahn was a courageous opposer of Jewish persecution by the Nazi Party and after World War II he became a passionate campaigner against the use of nuclear energy as a weapon.

Otto Hahn -- discovered nuclear fission, in particular, the split of uranium atom into barium and krypton.

In December 1938, the German chemist Otto Hahn discovered the nuclear fission of uranium at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry in Berlin. He made this breakthrough after years of collaboration with Austrian physicist Lise Meitner, who had fled to Sweden on account of her Jewish heritage shortly before Hahn made his discovery. In January 1939, Meitner and Otto Robert Fritsch wrote the first physical-theoretical interpretation of the process.

Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry in Berlin

Otto Hahn (1879-1968) Químico

Otto Hahn, The Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his discovery of the fission of heavy nuclei", nuclear chemistry

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