In his book about the passenger pigeon, the naturalist Joel Greenberg sets out to answer a puzzling question: How could the bird go from a population of billions to zero in less than fifty years?

The Birds

In his new book about the passenger pigeon, the naturalist Joel Greenberg sets out to answer a puzzling question: How could the bird go from a population of billions to zero in less than fifty years? Painting by Walton Ford. It tasted good.

Ancient DNA Could Return Passenger Pigeons to the Sky - Genetic engineering could restore the once profuse North American bird after a century or more of extinction

Passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) - Juvenile (left), male (center), female (right), Louis Agassiz Fuertes, 1910

Passenger Pigeon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Egg of Passenger Pigeon. Collection of James Bond /Jacques Perrin de Brichambaut. This photograph is published in Audubon Magazine May-June 2014

Passenger Pigeon - The species went from being one of the most abundant birds in the world during the 19th century to extinction early in the 20th century.  The world's last Passenger Pigeon, died on September 1, 1914.

Extinct Passenger Pigeon - The species went from being one of the most abundant birds in the world during the century to extinction early in the century. The world's last Passenger Pigeon, died on September

“Martha,” a passenger pigeon named after George Washington’s wife, was the last of her kind. Immediately following her death in 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoological Gardens, she was packed in an enormous 300-pound block of ice and shipped to the Smithsonian. #seriouslyamazing

"Martha" The passenger pigeon, Ectopistes migratorius, was once the most common bird in the United States, numbering in the billions.

The last passenger pigeon, Martha.  Died in captivity in 1914.  Once the most abundant bird in the world, passenger pigeons were knowingly hunted to extinction by American settlers.

Passengerpigeon, 200 years a go there were billions of these birds in North America, but when pigeon meat became popular they were hunted ruthlessly, the last passenger pigeon, Martha died at the Cincinatti Zoo

Dec. 28, 1973 | 43 years ago, the Endangered Species Act was signed on this day. The Endangered Species List traces its roots to the beginning of the 20th century, when the disappearance of the Passenger Pigeon led the government to try—in vain—to keep the birds alive by further regulating the hunting of game birds, as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service notes. Photo:  a specimen kindly made available by the Biology Department at Ball State University.

Dec. 28, 1973 | 43 years ago, the Endangered Species Act was signed on this day. The Endangered Species List traces its roots to the beginning of the 20th century, when the disappearance of the Passenger Pigeon led the government to try—in vain—to keep the birds alive by further regulating the hunting of game birds, as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service notes. Photo: a specimen kindly made available by the Biology Department at Ball State University.

The 100th anniversary of the last of the species finds biologists dreaming of preventing or even reversing extinctions.

Passenger pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius) once blanketed the skies of eastern North America, but hunting and deforestation brought them to extinction 100 years ago. Martha, the last one, died at the Cincinnati Zoo in

The passenger pigeon, one of hundreds of species of extinct birds, was hunted to extinction over the course of a few decades

FUR, FEATHERS, & FERNS Learn about an Animal that has gone extinct in the last 100 years. The last known passenger pigeon died after being the most abundant bird in the world during the century.

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