Pictures of angles

Berenice Abbott, Manhattan Bridge, November 11, 1936

Manhattan Bridge by Berenice Abbott / American ArtManhattan Bridge 1936 Berenice Abbott Born: Springfield, Ohio 1898 Died: Monson, Maine 1991 gelatin silver print image: 9 x 7 in.) Smithsonian American Art Museum Gift of George McNeil

Abstract Photography!! a ton of photo fragments that when in many pieces seem chaotic, but when put together correctly make up a picture:)

Using the school building, think about interesting low angle shots you could take by looking up at the building to create effects like this.

The 21 Best Funny Pictures Of Today’s Internet

The 21 Best Funny Pictures Of Today’s Internet

Great design. Exact same dilemma I'm facing right now with the TV and wanting it on that same side next to my windows. I never thought about the possibility of setting the bookshelves at an angle until now.

Custom Built-In Bookcases - traditional - family room - other metro - by OasisDesign&Remodeling

Although these are very basic photographs, it shows the importance of angle. Simply by positioning the person and the camera a cetain way it brings out sections of the body larger and these two photos work very well with an unusual and unrealistic element.

Although these are very basic photographs, it shows the importance of angle. Simply by positioning the person and the camera a cetain way it brings out sections of the body larger and these two photos work very well with an unusual and unrealistic element

Photographer Randy Scott Slavin captured this stunning picture of the Empire State building in New York with a fisheye lens

Who needs Instagram? Extraordinary landscapes of America captured with good old fish-eye lens

I like this montage because it shows the different movements that the man would…

MOVEMENT stacking/layering Shooting Film: "joiners" - Creative Polaroid Collages by David Hockney

Lee Friedlander: America by Car

Lee Friedlander: America By Car - in pictures

i bet you thought you'd seen the last of me                              …

how beautiful is this picture of Cinderella Castle? Did you know that the castle is actually named "Cinderella" Castle, not "Cinderella's Castle?

Using a macro lens, UK-based photographer Janet Waters gets up close and personal with all kinds of liquids, bubbles, food dye, and soapy water. Where many artists like to have control of their final product, Waters actually counts on the unpredictable nature of liquids to create her captivating abstract designs.

Swirling Liquids Form Spectacular Macro Artwork

Using nothing but soap and a macro lens, Janet Waters photographs mesmerizing patterns on colored backdrops.

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