Cecilienhof was the location of the Potsdam Conference between 17 July and 2 August 1945. The rooms had been largely refurnished to match the taste of the participants. Winston Churchill, later Clement Attlee, Joseph Stalin and Harry S. Truman met at the round table in the great hall. On 26 July 1945, Churchill and Truman issued the Potsdam Declaration defining the terms for Japanese surrender, while Truman had already given order to prepare the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

July 1945 – World War II- the "Big Three" of the Allied nations,Churchill, Truman and Stalin, meet in Potsdam

Cecilienhof (Cecilia Court Palace), location of the famous Potsdam Conference after the WW II

Potsdam Conference, The Famous, Palaces, Children, Germany

The meeting room used by Truman, Churchill and Stalin) in the Cecilienhof Palace (site of the Potsdam conference from 16 July to 2 August 1945, at the end of World War II), Potsdam, Germany

The meeting room used by Truman, Churchill and Stalin) in the Cecilienhof Palace (site of the Potsdam conference from 16 July to 2 August at the end of World War II), Potsdam, Germany

The Potsdam Conference, Joseph Stalin Metal Print by Everett

The Potsdam Conference, Joseph Stalin Canvas Print / Canvas Art by Everett

The Potsdam Conference, Joseph Stalin Metal Print by Everett

Full Size Picture Potsdam conference 1945-8.jpg

British Prime Minister Clement Attlee, U. President Harry S. Truman and Joseph Stalin at the Potsdam Conference, July

La cour intérieure du château de Cecilienhof (Potsdam) (2731361224).jpg

La cour intérieure du château de Cecilienhof (Potsdam) (2731361224).jpg

Potsdam Conference-Cecilienhof Palace: Clement Attlee, Harry S. Truman, Josef Stalin. William Leahy, Ernest Bevin, James Byrnes, and Vyacheslav Molotov. 1945

Potsdam Conference-Cecilienhof Palace: Clement Attlee, Harry S. Truman, Josef Stalin. William Leahy, Ernest Bevin, James Byrnes, and Vyacheslav Molotov. 1945

The Market Gate of the Old City of Elblag a city in northern Poland about 34 miles south-east of Gdansk.  The city is a port on the River Elblag with access to the Baltic Sea. The  German Elbing was totally destroyed at the end of WW2. The city became the Polish Elblag after the war under border changes at the Potsdam Conference.

The Market Gate of the Old City of Elblag a city in northern Poland about 34 miles south-east of Gdansk. The city is a port on the River Elblag with access to the Baltic Sea. The German Elbing was totally destroyed at the end of WW2. The city became the Polish Elblag after the war under border changes at the Potsdam Conference.

Pinterest
Search