Astronomers have spotted a "rogue planet" - wandering the cosmos without a star to orbit - 100 light-years away. (via BBC News; image via ESO)

'Rogue planet' spotted 100 light-years away

Astronomers have spotted a "rogue planet" - wandering the cosmos without a star to orbit - 100 light-years away. (via BBC News; image via ESO)

42 Facts About Space, A Homage to Douglas Adams. - Imgur

42 Facts About Space, A Homage to Douglas Adams.

Giant 'Rogue' Worlds Are Less Common Than Scientists Thought

Giant 'Rogue' Worlds Are Less Common Than Scientists Thought

New work suggests that what appears to be a "rogue planet" is actually a pair of failed stars.

New work suggests that what appears to be a "rogue planet" is actually a pair of failed stars.

Rogue Planets May Be Even Lonelier Than We Thought

Rogue Planets May Be Even Lonelier Than We Thought

Rogue Planets May Be Even Lonelier Than We Thought

Rogue Planets May Be Even Lonelier Than We Thought

Wandering in the Void, Billions of Rogue Planets without a Home  New results suggest free-floating giant planets are less common than previously believed, but hint at vast numbers of smaller castaway worlds

Wandering in the Void, Billions of Rogue Planets without a Home New results suggest free-floating giant planets are less common than previously believed, but hint at vast numbers of smaller castaway worlds

The Universe is amazing! Did you know this about Rogue planets?

Some stars capture rogue planets

The Universe is amazing! Did you know this about Rogue planets?

Three years ago, a mysterious object was observed drifting alone in interstellar space, 80 light-years from Earth. Much bigger than Jupiter but smaller than most stars, it was called a rogue planet, and now astronomers can confirm that the object is indeed a planet. PSO J318.5338-22.8603, or PSO J318.5-22 for short, is a large planetary object in the Beta Pictoris moving group. It has a mass of 8.3 times that of Jupiter and a temperature of about 1100 Kelvins. A detailed description of the…

Three years ago, a mysterious object was observed drifting alone in interstellar space, 80 light-years from Earth. Much bigger than Jupiter but smaller than most stars, it was called a rogue planet, and now astronomers can confirm that the object is indeed a planet. PSO J318.5338-22.8603, or PSO J318.5-22 for short, is a large planetary object in the Beta Pictoris moving group. It has a mass of 8.3 times that of Jupiter and a temperature of about 1100 Kelvins. A detailed description of the…

And astronomers have found an ingenious way to spot them.

And astronomers have found an ingenious way to spot them.

Giant 'Rogue' Worlds Are Less Common Than Scientists Thought The gravity of a free-floating “rogue” planet may deflect and focus light from a distant star when passing closely in front of it. Owing to the distorted image, the star temporarily seems much brighter. Credit: J. Skowron/Warsaw University Observatory The researchers determined that the Milky Way likely hosts a maximum of one Jupiter-like rogue for every four main-sequence stars — still a lot, but ...

Giant 'Rogue' Worlds Are Less Common Than Scientists Thought The gravity of a free-floating “rogue” planet may deflect and focus light from a distant star when passing closely in front of it. Owing to the distorted image, the star temporarily seems much brighter. Credit: J. Skowron/Warsaw University Observatory The researchers determined that the Milky Way likely hosts a maximum of one Jupiter-like rogue for every four main-sequence stars — still a lot, but ...

"Nomad planets" could be surprisingly common in our bustling galaxy, according to researchers at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), a joint institute of Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The study predicts that there may be 100,000 times more of these wandering, homeless planets than stars in the Milky Way.

Nomad Alien Planets May Fill Our Milky Way Galaxy

"Nomad planets" could be surprisingly common in our bustling galaxy, according to researchers at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), a joint institute of Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The study predicts that there may be 100,000 times more of these wandering, homeless planets than stars in the Milky Way.

Rogue planets can form without a parent star

Rogue planets can form without a parent star

thenewenlightenmentage: “ 200 Billion Free-Floating Starless Planets Roam the Milky Way Astronomers observing the Rosette Nebula, a huge cloud of gas and dust 4600 light years from Earth in the.

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