“A komusō (虚無僧) was a Japanese monk during the Edo period. Komusō were characterised by the straw basket (tengai) worn on the head, manifesting the absence of specific ego. They are also known for playing solo pieces on the shakuhachi flute. The Japanese government introduced reforms after the Edo period, abolishing the sect. Komusō means ”priest of nothingness” or “monk of emptiness”"    - Wikipedia

Komuso “Basket” monks, Japanese monks who wore baskets on their heads to symbolize emptiness.

A komuso Buddhist monk in Kamakura, Japan. Komuso monks travelled widely on pilgrimage, hiding their faces under straw hats to help them to achieve humility. They were adherents of Fuke Zen Buddhism, and they used to be a common sight in Japan. They played the shakuhachi flute both as a form of meditation, and to call for alms. Ninja may have disguised themselves as komuso monks so they could travel freely throughout the country without arising suspicion.

A komuso Buddhist monk in Kamakura, Japan. Komuso monks travelled widely on…

A Komuso (literally, nothingness monk) of the Fuke Zen sect, wearing a "tengai": a woven straw hat which covers the head completely. The tengai indicates the denial of self, taught by the practice. Komusa also carry and play the "shakuhachi", a bamboo flute.

A Komuso (literally, nothingness monk) of the Fuke Zen sect, wearing a "tengai": a woven straw hat which covers the head completely. The tengai indicates the denial of self, taught by the practice. Komusa also carry and play the "shakuhachi" bamboo flute.

Lot 199: IVORY NETSUKE Depicting a shakuhachi flute player with a basketry mask. Signed. - Eldred's | Invaluable

IVORY NETSUKE Late Meiji Period <br /> Depicting a shakuhachi flute player with a basketry mask.

End-blown SHAKUHACHI (flute) probably 1930s  Yamaguchi Shiro, Japanese, 1885–1963, Bamboo, Music: Asa Kaze ("Morning Breeze") by Nakao Tozan, 1938 (performed by Mary Ellen Miller). MFA

End-blown flute (shakuhachi) probably Yamaguchi Shiro, Japanese, Bamboo, Music: Asa Kaze ("Morning Breeze") by Nakao Tozan, 1938 (performed by Mary Ellen Miller).

The shakuhachi is a Japanese end-blown flute. It was originally introduced from China into Japan in the 6th century and underwent a resurgence in the early Edo Period. The shakuhachi is traditionally made of bamboo, but versions now exist in ABS and hardwoods. It was used by the monks of the Fuke school of Zen Buddhism in the practice of suizen (blowing meditation)

Shakuhachi flute, Japanese Flute, end-blown flutes, musical instruments by Monty Levenson

3D Printed Antique Bronze Shakuhachi Flute by thedroppingform, $199.99

Items similar to Printed Antique Bronze Shakuhachi Flute on Etsy

Shakuhachi Flute, 1.8 key of D ~ Advanced Root End ~ Goma Madake Bamboo ~ Jiari Cast Interior with Red Lacquer ~ Inlaid Golden Bindings  This finely textured Goma (naturally occurring sesame seed texture) Madake bamboo was harvested and cured in the southeastern US.  This shakuhachi has

Shakuhachi Flute, key of D ~ Advanced Root End ~ Goma Madake Bamboo ~ Jiari Cast Interior with Red Lacquer ~ Inlaid Golden Bindings

Pilgrim

The Narrow Road to the Deep North is another beautiful pilgrimage tale by Basho the hailku poet. toshi kurenu / kasa kite waraji / hakinagara another year is gone / a traveler's shade on my head, / straw sandals at my feet

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