The Spencer repeating rifle was a manually operated lever-action, repeating rifle fed from a tube magazine with cartridges. It was adopted by the Union army, especially by the cavalry, during the American Civil War, but did not really replace the standard issue muzzle-loading rifled muskets in use at the time. The Spencer carbine was a shorter and lighter version of the Spencer repeating rifle.

The Spencer repeating rifle was a manually operated lever-action, repeating rifle fed from a tube magazine with cartridges. It was adopted by the Union army, especially by the cavalry, during the American Civil War, but did not really replace the standard issue muzzle-loading rifled muskets in use at the time. The Spencer carbine was a shorter and lighter version of the Spencer repeating rifle.

SPENCER REPEATING RIFLE WITH LATER ADDED DECORATIVE INDIAN TACKS - .56-56 caliber, 20" barrel, serial number 102608. Top of receiver stamped Spencer Repeating Rifle Co. Boston, Mass Patented March 6th, 1860.

SPENCER REPEATING RIFLE WITH LATER ADDED DECORATIVE INDIAN TACKS - .56-56 caliber, 20" barrel, serial number 102608. Top of receiver stamped Spencer Repeating Rifle Co. Boston, Mass Patented March 6th, 1860.

The Spencer repeating rifle put an unheard-of amount of firepower into the hands of the few Union soldiers who wielded them

The 10 guns that defined America: Ex-Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle's most important firearms in history revealed in posthumous book

The Spencer Rifle was also carried on wagon trains to protect the people and hunt for food.

The Spencer repeating rifle was a manually operated lever-action, repeating rifle fed from a tube magazine with cartridges. It was adopted by the Union Army, especially by the cavalry, during the American Civil War, but did not replace the standard issue muzzle-loading rifled muskets in use at the time. The Spencer carbine was a shorter and lighter version.

The Spencer repeating rifle was a manually operated lever-action, repeating rifle fed from a tube magazine with cartridges. It was adopted by the Union Army, especially by the cavalry, during the American Civil War, but did not replace the standard issue muzzle-loading rifled muskets in use at the time. The Spencer carbine was a shorter and lighter version.

Pvt. John Munson of Attica, Indiana. He served in Company F, 72nd Indiana (Wilder's Brigade), and is pictured here on horseback holding his Spencer repeating rifle.

Great image of John Munson on horseback holding his Spencer repeating rifle. Munson was a member of the Indiana Infantry, Co. F, (Wilder's Brigade) His residence was near Attica, Indiana.

Spencer rifle diagram - Spencer repeating rifle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Spencer Model 1860 repeating carbine Designed by Christopher Spencer and manufactured Spencer seven-round tubular magazine, lever action and manually cocked hammer, saddle ring and ladder sight.

Spencer repeating rifle - Wikipedia

Spencer repeating rifle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Spencer Repeating Rifle .56  http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/United%20States%20Rifles/SPENCER%20CIVIL%20WAR%20CARBINE/imageQ2T.JPG

Spencer Repeating Rifle .56 http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/United%20States%20Rifles/SPENCER%20CIVIL%20WAR%20CARBINE/imageQ2T.JPG

Spencer Repeating Rifle. Gun

The Spencer repeating rifle was a technological milestone that came into being just before the American Civil War.

Spencer repeating rifle with Confederated markings, American Civil War

Spencer repeating rifle with Confederated markings, American Civil War

Fine example of an Indian War refurbished Civil War Model 1860 Spencer Repeating Carbine by Springfield, .50 cal. Blade front and folding ladder rear sights, with "SPENCER REPEATING-/RIFLE CO. BOSTON MASS./PAT'D MARCH.6. 1860." on top of the frame, with a short saddle ring bar and single letter proofs on a number of parts.  The Spencer repeating rifle was first adopted by the United States Navy.

Fine example of an Indian War refurbished Civil War Model 1860 Spencer Repeating Carbine by Springfield, .50 cal. Blade front and folding ladder rear sights, with "SPENCER REPEATING-/RIFLE CO. BOSTON MASS./PAT'D MARCH.6. 1860." on top of the frame, with a short saddle ring bar and single letter proofs on a number of parts. The Spencer repeating rifle was first adopted by the United States Navy.

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