Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS), or superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO), is usually the result of the direct obstruction of the superior vena cava by malignancies such as compression of the vessel wall by right upper lobe tumors or thymoma and/or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The most common malignancy that causes SVCS is bronchogenic carcinoma

SVCS can be caused by invasion or compression by a pathological process or by thrombosis in the vein itself, although this latter is less common (approximately due to the use of intravascular

The most common causes of superior vena cava syndrome are extrinsic compression of the superior vena cava and intraluminal venous thrombosis

The most common causes of superior vena cava syndrome are extrinsic compression of the superior vena cava and intraluminal venous thrombosis

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome occurs when the SVC is compressed or obstructed by tumor growth. Signs and symptoms result from blockage of blood flow in the venous system of the head, neck, and upper trunk. Early s/s which generally occur in the morning, include edema of the face, especially around the eyes, and tightness of shirt collars. As condition worsens, the client experiences edema of the arms and hands, dyspnea, erythema of the upper body, and epistaxis.

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome occurs when the SVC is compressed or obstructed by tumor growth. Signs and symptoms result from blockage of blood flow in the venous system of the head, neck, and upper trunk. Early s/s which generally occur in the morning, include edema of the face, especially around the eyes, and tightness of shirt collars. As condition worsens, the client experiences edema of the arms and hands, dyspnea, erythema of the upper body, and epistaxis.

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome — NEJM

Images in Clinical Medicine from The New England Journal of Medicine — Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

Superior vena cava syndrome: Relief with a modified saphenojugular bypass graft

Superior vena cava syndrome: Relief with a modified saphenojugular bypass graft

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome – Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Ongoing care - Partial or complete obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC): 90% extrinsic 90% from neoplasm (most frequently lung cancer)   Read more: http://health.tipsdiscover.com/superior-vena-cava-syndrome-causes-symptoms-diagnosis-treatment-ongoing-care/#ixzz2lvo94Rdg

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome – Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Ongoing care - Partial or complete obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC): 90% extrinsic 90% from neoplasm (most frequently lung cancer) Read more: http://health.tipsdiscover.com/superior-vena-cava-syndrome-causes-symptoms-diagnosis-treatment-ongoing-care/#ixzz2lvo94Rdg

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome - can occur d/t obstruction from a tumor

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome - can occur d/t obstruction from a tumor

Physical manifestation of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome. Look out for Stokes sign. Potentially life threatening.

Physical manifestation of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome. Look out for Stokes sign. Potentially life threatening.

Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is obstruction of blood flow through the superior vena cava (SVC). It is a medical emergency and most often manifests in patients with a malignant disease process within the thorax   Obstruction of the SVC may be caused by neoplastic invasion of the venous wall associated with intravascular thrombosis or more simply by extrinsic pressure of a tumor mass against the relatively thin-walled SVC. Complete SVC obstruction is the result of intravascular…

Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is obstruction of blood flow through the superior vena cava (SVC). It is a medical emergency and most often manifests in patients with a malignant disease process within the thorax Obstruction of the SVC may be caused by neoplastic invasion of the venous wall associated with intravascular thrombosis or more simply by extrinsic pressure of a tumor mass against the relatively thin-walled SVC. Complete SVC obstruction is the result of intravascular…

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome | Vascular Disease Management Volume 11 Issue 6- June 2014

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome | Vascular Disease Management Volume 11 Issue 6- June 2014

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome | Vascular Disease Management Volume 11 Issue 6- June 2014

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome | Vascular Disease Management Volume 11 Issue 6- June 2014

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome | Vascular Disease Management Volume 11 Issue 6- June 2014

Endovascular Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava-Right Atrial Junction in Combination With Laser Lead Extraction for Iatrogenic Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

Superior vena cava syndrome appearance

Superior vena cava syndrome appearance

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