What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage

What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage

These five maps look at how the 2012 election would have played out before everyone could vote.

Katherine Wilson Sheppard (10 March 1847 – 13 July 1934) was the prominent member of New Zealand's women's suffrage movement. New Zealand was the first country to give women the right to vote.

Kate Sheppard, the most prominent member of New Zealand's women's suffrage movement. New Zealand was the first country to introduce universal suffrage so Sheppard's work had a considerable impact on women's suffrage movements in other countries

Earl Grey in an etching dated 1789 by James Sayers.  Charles Grey, the British Prime Minister who oversaw the introduction of the 1832 Reform Act (leading eventually to universal suffrage for all adults, genuine constituencies, and secret ballots), is best remembered for the tea which carries his name.

Charles Grey in blue coat, white waistcoat and tied cravat, and powdered hair, by Henry Bone (after Thomas Lawrence), August He had a illegitimate daughter with Georgina Duchess of Devonshire

Emily Wilding Davison at the Derby Few individuals have made a more powerful protest than suffragette Emily Wilding Davison, who threw herself under a horse owned by King George V at the Epsom Derby in 1913. Some believe she was only trying to attach a suffragette flag to the horse, but she quickly became celebrated as a feminist martyr. Universal suffrage was finally introduced in 1928.

Famous British protests

Emily Wilding Davison at the Derby Few individuals have made a more powerful protest than suffragette Emily Wilding Davison, who threw herself under a horse owned by King George V at the Epsom Derby in

If only White Men could vote, this is what the electoral map would look like.

What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage

Mary Church Terrell House, Washington, DC Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) was born during the Civil War and her life’s work for universal suffrage, equal opportunity and protections under the law for all individuals was one of the cornerstones of the Civil Rights movement. She in turn carried on the work of Frederick Douglass and the anti-slavery movement before her, and she would be followed by more civil right leaders. Much more is online.

Mary Church Terrell House, Washington, DC Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) was born during the Civil War and her life’s work for universal suffrage, equal opportunity and protections under the law for all individuals was one of the cornerstones of the Civil Rights movement. She in turn carried on the work of Frederick Douglass and the anti-slavery movement before her, and she would be followed by more civil right leaders. Much more is online.

Kate Sheppard: "She was instrumental in making New Zealand the first country in the world to grant women the right to vote (1893)..." | Encyclopædia Britannica

Kate Sheppard - our most famous Suffragette. Thanks to Kate, New Zealand women were the first in the world to be given the right to vote in

Women in Culture — Google Arts & Culture

Women in Culture — Google Arts & Culture

The 45 Most Powerful Photos Of 2014 - BuzzFeed News

The 45 Most Powerful Photos Of 2014

Protestors and student demonstrators hold up their cellphones in a display of solidarity during a protest outside the headquarters of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong on September (Xaume Olleros/AFP/Getty Images) # © Boston Big Picture

New Zealand (208) 1968 75th Anniversary of Universal Suffrage in New Zealand - Placing Votes in ballot Box

New Zealand 1968 Anniversary of Universal Suffrage in New Zealand - Placing Votes in ballot Box

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