Henry Moore - saw this as part of a large Henry Moore exhibition at the Burrell in Glasgow, all outside in the parkland..... my 7 year old daughter took amazing photos.... that was the first time she asked for a camera....

Henry Moore: In the garden of delights

Henry Moore - saw this as part of a large Henry Moore exhibition at the Burrell in Glasgow, all outside in the parkland. my 7 year old daughter took amazing photos. that was the first time she asked for a camera.

Although this piece has a static feel to it, it still reads off as a sad scene because the figures have no faces.  I do feel that this is a good political piece because most people effected by WW2 were seen as such, figures with no real identity.  It does confuse me with the figure on the right, how her head is darker than the other figures. It feels like she's being pushed back into space when I feel like the figure on the right is sitting further back on the bed than the one on the right.

Henry Moore, sketches of Londoners seeking shelter from air raids in the Underground, WWII

I really enjoy looking at this piece because of how all the figures have a different body type even though there is no clear detail on what the figures look like.  This piece reminds me of African art and sculpture pieces which is another reason why I think I'm so attracted to the piece.  The way the lines seem to show so much static but still confined to somewhat of a shape helps move the viewer's eyes all throughout the piece.

Henry Moore, Thirteen Standing Figures, 1958 (Original lithograph printed on English handmade wove paper. Hand signed and dated by the artist in pencil "Moore lower right.


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