Sans serif typeface: A typeface without serifs.

Sans Serif is the more modern typeface used today. It is referred to Sans Serif because of the absence of the small decorative strokes at the ends of the letters which are present in the 'Serif' typeface.

Bowl: The fully closed, rounded part of a letter. Definition: In typography, the curved part of the character that encloses the circular or curved parts (counter) of some letters such as d, b, o, D, and B is the bowl. Some sources call any parts of a letter enclosing a space a bowl.

The blue portion of the "b" is an example of a bowl, which is a fully closed, rounded part of the letter.

Point:  A unit of measurement, often used to measure type size, equal to 0.013837 inch (approximately equal to 1/72"). The traditional point measurement was slightly more or less than 72 points to the inch

Point: A unit of measurement, often used to measure type size, equal to inch (approximately equal to The traditional point measurement was slightly more or less than 72 points to the inch

Italic A style of letterform with a pronounced diagonal slant

While roman typefaces are upright, italic typefaces slant to the right. But rather than being just a slanted or tilted version of the roman face, a true or pure italic font is drawn from scratch and has unique features not found in the roman face.

Stroke: The main diagonal portion of a letterform such as in N, M, or Y is the stroke. The stroke is secondary to the main stem(s). Some letterforms with two diagonals, such as A or V have a stem (the primary vertical or near-vertical stroke) and a stroke (the main diagonal)

Stroke: The main diagonal portion of a letterform such as in N, M, or Y is the stroke. The stroke is secondary to the main stem(s). Some letterforms with two diagonals, such as A or V have a stem (the primary vertical or near-vertical stroke) and a stroke (the main diagonal)

The type's point size which is determined by measuring from the highest ascender to the lowest descender (plus any additional white space to the descender line).

The Body size is a type's point size determined by measuring the distance between the text's highest ascender and the lowest descender

Justified: The text of a paragraph is aligned on the right-hand side with the left-hand side ragged. It's used to set off special text such as attributions to authors of quotes printed in books and magazines

Justified: The text of a paragraph is aligned on the right-hand side with the left-hand side ragged. It's used to set off special text such as attributions to authors of quotes printed in books and magazines

Weight: The measurement of a stroke's width. Common names for weights include demibold, light, and bold. Some typeface families have several weights, including ultra-bold and extra-light. Refers to the heaviness of the stroke for a specific font, such as Light, Regular, Book, Demi, Heavy, Black, and Extra Bold.

WEIGHT - Relative darkness of the characters of a type font resulting from the relative thickness of the strokes, expressed as light, bold, extra bold.

Serif: Small, finishing strokes on the arms, stems, and tails of characters. Serif typefaces are usually used for text since the serifs form a link between letters that leads the eye across a line of type.

Serif: Small, finishing strokes on the arms, stems, and tails of characters. Serif typefaces are usually used for text since the serifs form a link between letters that leads the eye across a line of type.

Counter: The open space in a fully or partly closed area within a letter. Definition: In typography, the enclosed or partially enclosed circular or curved negative space (white space) of some letters such as d, o, and s is the counter.

Counter: The open space in a fully or partly closed area within a letter. Definition: In typography, the enclosed or partially enclosed circular or curved negative space (white space) of some letters such as d, o, and s is the counter.


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