Bullet through the Apple, 1964 MIT professor Harold Edgerton invented the strobe flash in the 1930s and this is an example of his stroboscopic photography

Dr Strobe: the man who stopped time and electrified photography – in pictures

Milk Drop Coronet, 1957 by Harold "Doc" Edgerton

Milk Drop Coronet 1957 Harold Edgerton photographer the artist was a professor at an electric engineering college

Vintage Strobe Light Photographs Are A Beautiful Anatomy of Motion | The Creators Project

Vintage Strobe Light Photographs Are A Beautiful Anatomy of Motion

Harold Edgerton, Nuclear explosion photographed with a Rapatronic Camera 1 millisecond after detonation, 1952.

Nuclear explosion photographed less than one millisecond after detonation. From the Tumbler-Snapper test series in Nevada, showing fireball and "rope trick" effects. The fireball is about 20 meters in diameter in this shot.

Harold Edgerton Fanning the cards, 1940 Gelatin silver print 35.5 x 28 cm © Harold Edgerton, 2013, courtesy of Palm Press, Inc.

frozen motion Harold Edgerton Fanning the cards, 1940 Gelatin silver print x 28 cm © Harold Edgerton, courtesy of Palm Press, Inc.

Harold Edgerton (Rising Dove, 1934)

“ Harold Edgerton “Rising Dove,” 1934 (from crashinglybeautiful, Wait-what?, and liquidnight, billyjane.

Harold Edgerton: Water Falling from Faucet, 1932

I really like this photo taken by Harold Edgerton because of the way it captures the water in motion by using high speed photography. It is really unique becasue of the way it makes the water have a sort of "texture" to it.

Harold Edgerton (1903-1990) - Champagne (Popping the Cork), ca 1939. S)

varietas: “ Harold Edgerton: Champagne popping the cork, c 1939 ”

Harold Edgerton, Football Kick, 1934, printed later, gift of the Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation

(Football Kick) printed 1976 Harold E. Edgerton Born: Fremont, Nebraska 1903 Died: Cambridge, Massachusetts 1990 Gus Kayafas (Printer) Palm Press, Inc. (Workshop) gelatin silver print sheet: 14 x 11 in.

Pinterest
Search