A CONSOLIDATED MINE (1885) | St Ives, Cornwall. 'Mining was another huge industry in the county, with tin and copper mines dotting the landscape.'     ✫ღ⊰n

Photos of the real Poldark country shows poverty of historic Cornwall

A portfolio of more than images of Cornwall are to be sold at Penzance Auction House with an estimate of This rare collection of photographs depict the ordinary lives of Cornish men and women from the and early century

BAL MAIDEN: 'Gook' is the Cornish word for this traditional bonnet worn by a bal maiden.     ✫ღ⊰n

BAL MAIDEN: 'Gook' is the Cornish word for this traditional bonnet worn by a bal maiden. ✫ღ⊰n-----"bal" is Cornish for mines and maiden naturally is a young, unmarried women.

BAL MAIDENS SPALLING AND LOADING ORE WAGON (1880) | Carn Brea, Cornwall: Harpers Magazine (1881)     ✫ღ⊰n

BAL MAIDENS SPALLING AND LOADING ORE WAGON (1880) | Carn Brea, Cornwall: Harpers Magazine (1881) ✫ღ⊰n

"Women wearing 'gooks' at Lowender Peran Celtic Festival, Perranporth." Photograph: Perran Tremewan

Cornish and proud: how to dress in the traditional Cornwall way

Hannah Marriott: Express your joy in Cornwall's newfound minority status by sporting the local tartan or perhaps a bonnet.

bal maidens - Google Search

bal maidens - Google Search

Cornish and proud: how to dress in the traditional Cornwall way

Hannah Marriott: Express your joy in Cornwall's newfound minority status by sporting the local tartan or perhaps a bonnet.

Inglis Gundry - The Tinners of Cornwall - production photographs

Inglis Gundry - The Tinners of Cornwall - production photographs

THOMAS MERRITT | Illogan Highway, Redruth, Cornwall: The home of the Cornish composer     ✫ღ⊰n

Home of Thomas Merritt, Cornish composer, in Illogan Highway, Redruth, Cornwall

Illogan Cemetery, Cornwall

Illogan Cemetery, Cornwall

Bal maidens in traditional protective clothing. A bal maiden, from the Cornish language bal, a mine and the English maiden, a young or unmarried woman, was a female manual labourer working in the mining industries of Cornwall and the bordering areas of western Devon, at the south-western extremity of Great Britain.

Bal maidens, Dolcoath from the Cornish language bal, a mine and the English maiden, a young or unmarried woman, was a female manual labourer working in the mining industries of Cornwall and the bordering areas of western Devon.

SimoninLge.jpg (445×650)

SimoninLge.jpg (445×650)

DOLCOATH MINE (c.1890): 'The earliest records of women workers in Cornwall date from the Middle Ages and were employed in particularly large numbers from about 1770 to 1860. After the Black Death mining declined, and no records of female workers have been found from then until the late 17th century. Between 1800 and 1851 the number of Cornish female workers rose from 2,000 to 6,000. In total from 1720-1920 there were at least 80,000 women working in the Cornish mining industry.'     ✫ღ⊰n

Getting ready for 2010

DOLCOATH MINE (c.1890): 'The earliest records of women workers in Cornwall date from the Middle Ages and were employed in particularly large numbers from about 1770 to 1860. After the Black Death mining declined, and no records of female workers have been found from then until the late 17th century. Between 1800 and 1851 the number of Cornish female workers rose from 2,000 to 6,000. In total from 1720-1920 there were at least 80,000 women working in the Cornish mining industry.' ✫ღ⊰n

"Jinny [Martin] was a spaller at the mine" (Ross Poldark, 1, iii, 3). Spalling - breaking up ore using a cobbing hammer. Bal-maiden - a girl who works on the surface of a mine (F.W.P. Jago, The Ancient Language and the Dialect of Cornwall, p. 111). Img: wiki

BAL MAIDEN: 'Jinny [Martin] was a spaller at the mine' (Ross Poldark, iii, Spalling - breaking up ore using a cobbing hammer. Bal-maiden - a girl who works on the surface of a mine (F. Jago, 'The Ancient Language and the Dialect of Cornwall', ✫ღ⊰n

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