Glyn Barrett

Glyn Barrett

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Glyn Barrett
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The Tiberius Psalter. England (Winchester), c.1050. British Library Cotton Tiberius C VI  Folio 13, Crucifixion

The Tiberius Psalter. England (Winchester), British Library Cotton Tiberius C VI Folio Crucifixion

A contemporary portrayal of King Edgar the Peaceful in the New Minster Charter.

Edgar I (Old English: Ēadgār; 943 – 8 July known as Edgar the Peaceful or the Peaceable, was King of England from 959 to He was the younger son of King Edmund I and his Queen, Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury - New Minster Charter 966 detail Edgar.

Viking Thor’s Hammer Pendant, 10th Century AD Silver pendant in the shape of a stylized hammer. The obverse side engraved with interlaced bands. The suspension ring in the shape of an eagle’s head....

Viking Thor’s Hammer Pendant, Century AD Silver pendant in the shape of a stylized hammer. The obverse side engraved with interlaced bands. The suspension ring in the shape of an eagle’s head.

History in the News: Eadgyth: the oldest remains of an English princess

by Kathryn Hadley The University of Bristol announced today, January the recent discovery of the remains of the Saxon Princess Eadgyt.

Saint Etheldreda

Saint Etheldreda - Find A Grave Memorial

KING ÆTHELRED II (c.968-1016) ruled from 978-1013, then again from 1014-1016. HOUSE OF WESSEX. He first married ÆLFGIFU OF YORK, of whom very little is known, save for the fact that she bore him 9 children. His second wife and QUEEN CONSORT was EMMA OF NORMANDY. Upon her marriage, she adopted the English name ÆLFGIFU. She bore Æthelred three children, Edward, Alfred, and Goda.

King Ethelred the Unready or Ethelred II He was king of England when in 1002 he ordered a massacre of Danish settlers. In 1003 "King Sweyn of Denmark" invaded and Ethelred fled. He returned in 1014 after the Sweyn died and became king once again.

He's learning Norse code

He's learning Norse code

Roundels depicting Alfred, Æthelflæd and Edward the Elder, from a 14th-century genealogical chronicle (London, British Library, MS Royal 14 B VI).

Roundels depicting Alfred, Æthelflæd and Edward the Elder, from a genealogical chronicle (London, British Library, MS Royal 14 B VI).

Æthelwulf (Old English for "Noble Wolf"[2]) was King of Wessex from 839 to 858.[a] In 825 his father, King Egbert, defeated King Beornwulf of Mercia, ending a long Mercian dominance over Anglo-Saxon England south of the Humber. Egbert sent Æthelwulf with an army to Kent, where he expelled the Mercian sub-king and was appointed sub-king. After 830, Egbert maintained good relations with Mercia, and this was continued by Æthelwulf when he became king in 839.

Æthelwulf in the early fourteenth-century Genealogical Roll of the Kings of England