Jacquelyn Graham

Jacquelyn Graham

3 followers
·
40 followers
PhD student in Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Aberdeen.
Jacquelyn Graham
More ideas from Jacquelyn
Archaeologists digging at a 700-year-old coastal village in Alaska that has been exposed by erosion and melting ice have uncovered 60 wooden dolls that were used as toys and for ceremonial purposes.

Archaeologists digging at a coastal village in Alaska that has been exposed by erosion and melting ice have uncovered 60 wooden dolls that were used as toys and for ceremonial purposes.

Quinhagak treasures

Quinhagak treasures

This four-inch wooden doll is one of many found on the site. They were used variously as toys, ceremonial items and as portraits of people who were otherwise unable to attend events in person. Quinhagak, Alaska

This four-inch wooden doll is one of many found on the site. They were used variously as toys, ceremonial items and as portraits of people who were otherwise unable to attend events in person.

Quinhagak treasures. Grass basketry, woven mats and cordage have been recovered in quantity. Grass artifacts are extremely rare on archaeological sites. The Nunalleq site is exceptionally well preserved by permafrost, which has recently begun to melt with the onset of warmer annual temperatures.

Quinhagak treasures. Grass basketry, woven mats and cordage have been recovered in quantity. Grass artifacts are extremely rare on archaeological sites. The Nunalleq site is exceptionally well preserved by permafrost, which has recently begun to melt with the onset of warmer annual temperatures.

This is the only complete, full-sized mask found on the site so far. It depicts a human-wolf transformation in that it has features of both a wolf and a human. Transformation is a common theme in arctic artwork, reflecting ancient shamanic beliefs that animals could sometimes transform themselves into humans and vice-versa. This mask still bears traces of silver colored surface paint, probably made from ground mica. DEPT. OF ARCHAEOLOGY — University of Aberdeen

This is the only complete, full-sized mask found on the site so far. It depicts a human-wolf transformation in that it has features of both a wolf and a human. Transformation is a common theme in arctic artwork, reflecting ancient shamanic beliefs that animals could sometimes transform themselves into humans and vice-versa. This mask still bears traces of silver colored surface paint, probably made from ground mica. DEPT. OF ARCHAEOLOGY — University of Aberdeen

Dr. Charlotta Hillerdal of the University of Aberdeen holds the only complete, full-sized mask found on the site so far. It depicts a human-wolf transformation in that it has features of both a wolf and a human. Transformation is a common theme in arctic artwork, reflecting ancient shamanic beliefs that animals could sometimes transform themselves into humans and vice-versa. This mask still bears traces of silver colored surface paint, probably made from ground mica.

Dr. Charlotta Hillerdal of the University of Aberdeen holds the only complete, full-sized mask found on the site so far. It depicts a human-wolf transformation in that it has features of both a wolf and a human. Transformation is a common theme in arctic artwork, reflecting ancient shamanic beliefs that animals could sometimes transform themselves into humans and vice-versa. This mask still bears traces of silver colored surface paint, probably made from ground mica.