Jacquelyn Graham

Jacquelyn Graham

PhD student in Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Aberdeen.
Jacquelyn Graham
More ideas from Jacquelyn
Covering the period of 1620 (the Puritans’ arrival at Plymouth Rock) through 1800 (Deism and the election of Thomas Jefferson), this 30-minute lecture will prep your students to dig deeper into any literary works from this era that you want. Great for giving students a general idea of the important issues and philosophies that guided the literary canon from this time period in U.S. history.

Covering the period of 1620 (the Puritans’ arrival at Plymouth Rock) through 1800 (Deism and the election of Thomas Jefferson),

The artifacts released by the effects of sea ice reduction may help the scientists better understand how the Yup'ik people adapted to a rapidly changing climate.    The site, known as Nunalleq, was inhabited from around AD 1350 to AD 1650, during which time the area suffered through "The Little Ice Age".

Archaeologists race to excavate a 500 year old Alaskan site and learn about the Yup'ik Eskimo culture.

Archaeologists digging at a 700-year-old coastal village in Alaska that has been exposed by erosion and melting ice have uncovered 60 wooden dolls that were used as toys and for ceremonial purposes.

Archaeologists digging at a coastal village in Alaska that has been exposed by erosion and melting ice have uncovered 60 wooden dolls that were used as toys and for ceremonial purposes.

Aberdeen archaeologists rescue 700-year-old Yup'ik "melting village" in Quinhagak, Alaska

Aberdeen archaeologists rescue Yup'ik "melting village" in Quinhagak, Alaska

Quinhagak treasures

Quinhagak treasures

This four-inch wooden doll is one of many found on the site. They were used variously as toys, ceremonial items and as portraits of people who were otherwise unable to attend events in person. Quinhagak, Alaska

This four-inch wooden doll is one of many found on the site. They were used variously as toys, ceremonial items and as portraits of people who were otherwise unable to attend events in person.

Quinhagak treasures. Grass basketry, woven mats and cordage have been recovered in quantity. Grass artifacts are extremely rare on archaeological sites. The Nunalleq site is exceptionally well preserved by permafrost, which has recently begun to melt with the onset of warmer annual temperatures.

Quinhagak treasures. Grass basketry, woven mats and cordage have been recovered in quantity. Grass artifacts are extremely rare on archaeological sites. The Nunalleq site is exceptionally well preserved by permafrost, which has recently begun to melt with the onset of warmer annual temperatures.

This is the only complete, full-sized mask found on the site so far. It depicts a human-wolf transformation in that it has features of both a wolf and a human. Transformation is a common theme in arctic artwork, reflecting ancient shamanic beliefs that animals could sometimes transform themselves into humans and vice-versa. This mask still bears traces of silver colored surface paint, probably made from ground mica. DEPT. OF ARCHAEOLOGY — University of Aberdeen

This is the only complete, full-sized mask found on the site so far. It depicts a human-wolf transformation in that it has features of both a wolf and a human. Transformation is a common theme in arctic artwork, reflecting ancient shamanic beliefs that animals could sometimes transform themselves into humans and vice-versa. This mask still bears traces of silver colored surface paint, probably made from ground mica. DEPT. OF ARCHAEOLOGY — University of Aberdeen

Dr. Charlotta Hillerdal of the University of Aberdeen holds the only complete, full-sized mask found on the site so far. It depicts a human-wolf transformation in that it has features of both a wolf and a human. Transformation is a common theme in arctic artwork, reflecting ancient shamanic beliefs that animals could sometimes transform themselves into humans and vice-versa. This mask still bears traces of silver colored surface paint, probably made from ground mica.

Dr. Charlotta Hillerdal of the University of Aberdeen holds the only complete, full-sized mask found on the site so far. It depicts a human-wolf transformation in that it has features of both a wolf and a human. Transformation is a common theme in arctic artwork, reflecting ancient shamanic beliefs that animals could sometimes transform themselves into humans and vice-versa. This mask still bears traces of silver colored surface paint, probably made from ground mica.