THE ROYAL AIR FORCE IN BRITAIN, MAY 1942. Royal Air Force ground crew push a 4,000lb blast bomb towards the bay of a Vickers Wellington bomber of No 419 Squadron, Royal Air Force at Mildenhall.

RAF ground crew push a blast bomb towards the bay of a Vickers Wellington bomber of 419 Squadron, at RAF Mildenhall in (IWM photo)

Wellington bomber crew at RAF Mildenhall, UK, 1941. Photo by Cecil Beaton.

A portrait of the pilot and co-pilot in the cockpit of their No 149 Squadron Wellington bomber, probably at RAF Mildenhall in The pilot is David Donaldson, who was promoted to Wing Commander in 1943 at the age of Photo by Cecil Beaton

The crew of Vickers Wellington Mark X, HZ950, of No. 99 Squadron RAF, gather by…

The crew of Vickers Wellington Mark X, of No. 99 Squadron RAF, gather by…

ROYAL AIR FORCE BOMBER COMMAND, 1939-1941. An aircrew of No. 149 Squadron RAF disembark from their Vickers Wellington Mark IA at Mildenhall, Suffolk, after a flight.

C An aircrew of No. 149 Squadron RAF disembark from their Vickers Wellington Mark IA at Mildenhall Suffolk after a flight.

Armourers fuzing a 4,000-lb HC bomb ("Cookie") at Kairouan West, Tunisia, before loading it into a Vickers Wellington Mark X of No. 205 Group RAF, during preparations for a night bombing raid on Salerno, Italy, prior to the Allied landings at there, (Operation AVALANCHE). Date 1943

Armourers fuzing a HC bomb (“Cookie”) at Kairouan West, Tunisia, before loading it into a Vickers Wellington Mark X.

Ground crew of 300 (Polish) Squadron with Vickers Wellington bomber, circa 1941.

"Poles did it hard, and in the end had their country given away to the Russians. Deep, deep brand of treachery by among others Mr Churchill." KB Ground crew of 300 (Polish) Squadron with Vickers Wellington bomber, circa

bmashina: “Experimental interceptor Wellington Mk.II, with the tower installation of a 40-mm gun Vickers-S. it was Assumed that they can shoot enemy bomber formations from long distances. ”

II, with the tower installation of a gun Vickers-S. it was Assumed that they can shoot enemy bomber formations from long distances.

The Vickers Wellington heavy bomber was Britain's main bomber at the outbreak of the war.

RAF air crew checks out the next target - Vickers Wellington heavy bomber was Britain's main bomber at the outbreak of the war - 1940

Bombardiers window below nose turret. Vickers Wellington.

Close-up view of the nose shows bombardier's window below and behind the front defensive turret.

Paul Nash ‘Black and white negative, tail of Vickers Wellington bomber and hangar [Cowley?]’, 1940 © Tate

‘Black and white negative, tail of Vickers Wellington bomber and hangar [Cowley?]’, Paul Nash, 1940 - part of the digitised collection of the Tate Archive

ROYAL AIR FORCE BOMBER COMMAND, 1939-1941. Aircrew and Wellington bombers of No. 149 Squadron RAF at Mildenhall, Suffolk, before a night raid over Germany, 10 May 1941

CH An aircrew of No. 149 Squadron RAF gather by the nose of their Vickers Wellington Mark IC lined up with other aircraft of the Squadron at Mildenhall Suffolk before a night raid to Hamburg Germany

Vickers Wellington ~ BFD

Wellington Down: Bombs gone!” The voice of 19 year old Francis Palmer RAFVR air bomber, crackled over the intercom.

This shot illustrates the cramped conditions of the Frazier-Nash front turret of the Vickers Wellington bomber with its two .303 machine guns.

This shot illustrates the cramped conditions of the Frazier-Nash front turret of the Vickers Wellington bomber with its two machine guns.

How Bombardier works aboard British plane (1941)

Vintage Infodesign [114

JF Ptak Science Books Quick Post This great cutaway by the prolific S. Clatworthy appeared in the March 1941 issue of Popular Mechanics. It illustrates a section of the Vickers Wellington light bomber--a long and wide medium.

Eyes to the Skies

Vickers Wellington of No. 304 Polish Bomber Squadron at an airfield in Britain, 1942

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