Shropshire | National and English Heritage in the Welsh Marches

Beautiful historical houses and gardens owned by the national trust and English heritage near to us here in Shropshire. Enjoy a day out exploring history and there's always a great cafe for tea and cake too
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Stokesay Castle in Shropshire, England ...near Craven Arms and about 6 miles from Hopton House B&B

'Adorable, rickety and even cooler inside. Great woodwork in the hall. Stokesay Cottage, Shropshire, UK' Ah this was someone else's description and it makes me happy because my Grandad was the carpenter who restored the woodwork circa 1950 :D

The National Trust's Benthall Hall, Shropshire, is a 16th-century stone country house with surrounding gardens.

The National Trust's Benthall Hall, Shropshire, is a stone country house with surrounding gardens. Not open Thursday and Friday's

Carding Mill Valley and the Long Mynd - Take a walk across the wildlife-rich heathland and enjoy the views across the Shropshire Hills, or simply play in the stream in the valley.

Carding Mill Valley and the Long Mynd - Take a walk across the wildlife-rich heathland and enjoy the views across the Shropshire Hills, or simply play in the stream in the valley.

Croft Castle in Herefordshire In England - 1000 years of power, politics and pleasure in an intimate family home

The National Trust's Croft Castle in Herefordshire is a castle surrounded by historic woodland, farm and parkland.

Visit the National Trust's medieval Powis Castle and Garden, Powys, Wales

Visit the National Trust's medieval Powis Castle and Garden, Powys, Wales

Clun is an abandoned Castle about 6 miles from Hopton House in Shropshire, England. The ruins are in a beautiful setting by the River Clun

Clun is an abandoned Castle about 6 miles from Hopton House in Shropshire, England. The ruins are in a beautiful setting by the River Clun

Acton Burnell Castle Shropshire Tucked away in a quiet part of Shropshire is the graceful red sandstone shell of Acton Burnell Castle. It was built between 1284 and 1293 by Bishop Burnell, Edward I's Lord Chancellor, and Parliaments were held here twice, in 1283 and 1285. By 1420, the castle was abandoned, and it was allowed to decay while a new house, Acton Burnell Hall, was built beside it. Nonetheless, the castle remains an impressive example of a medieval fortified manor house.

Twice the home of parliaments, this red sandstone shell of a semi-fortified tower house was built between by Bishop Burnell, Edward I's Lord Chancellor.

Wroxeter Roman City | English Heritage - Shropshire

Wroxeter (or 'Viroconium' ) was the fourth largest city in Roman Britain. It began as a legionary fortress and later developed into a thriving civilian city.

Wenlock Priory in Much Wenlock - The tranquil ruins of Wenlock Priory stand in a picturesque setting on the fringe of beautiful Much Wenlock. An Anglo-Saxon monastery was founded here in about 680 by King Merewalh of Mercia, whose abbess daughter Milburge was hailed as a saint. Her relics were miraculously re-discovered here in 1101, attracting both pilgrims and prosperity to the priory.

Tranquil ruins in lovely setting. Re-founded by the Normans as a priory.

Mitchell's Fold Stone Circle  The focus of many local legends, Mitchell's Fold is a Bronze Age stone circle set in dramatic moorland on Stapeley Hill. It once consisted of some 30 stones, 15 of which are still visible.

Mitchell's Fold Stone Circle The focus of many local legends, Mitchell's Fold is a Bronze Age stone circle set in dramatic moorland on Stapeley Hill. It once consisted of some 30 stones, 15 of which are still visible.

White Ladies Priory in Shropshire. Ruins of the late 12th century church of a small nunnery of 'white ladies' or Augustinian canonesses.  The priory enjoyed a moment of high drama in 1651 when it briefly became the hiding place of Charles II after his defeat at the Battle of Worcester. Disguised as a woodsman with his face covered in soot, he soon moved to nearby Boscobel House.

Ruins of the late century church of a small nunnery of 'white ladies' or Augustinian canonesses. Charles II hid nearby in before moving to Boscobel House.

The National Trust's Wenlock Edge, Shropshire, is a narrow limestone escarpment that runs from Craven Arms to Ironbridge.

The National Trust's Wenlock Edge, Shropshire, is a narrow limestone escarpment that runs from Craven Arms to Ironbridge.

Boscobel House in Shropshire and its Royal Oak tree became famous as hiding places of King Charles II after defeat at the Battle of Worcester in 1651. After Charles’s visit Boscobel remained a working farm, and today you can visit the lodge, farmyard, gardens and a descendant of The Royal Oak. White Ladies Priory, another of Charles's hiding places, is a short walk away.

Boscobel House and its Royal Oak tree became famous as hiding places of King Charles II after defeat at the Battle of Worcester in Visitors can also see the dairy, farmyard, smithy and gardens.

Explore the dramatic ruins of Witley Court and travel back to a world of lavish house parties. Learn the stories behind the people who once lived and partied here, from servants to royal visitors. Discover elaborate parterre gardens and monumental fountains then find your way through enchanting woodland to the unique adventure play area. Witley Court has something for everyone to enjoy.

A hundred years ago, Witley Court was one of England's great country houses, hosting many extravagant parties.

Haughmond Abbey The extensive remains of an Augustinian abbey, including its abbots' quarters, refectory and cloister. The substantially surviving chapter house has a frontage richly bedecked with 12th and 14th century carving and statuary, and a fine timber roof of around 1500.

Extensive remains of Augustinian abbey, including abbots' quarters, refectory & cloister. Chapter house frontage with & century carving & statuary, timber roof Displays, picnic area.

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