Roses and wayside shrubs

Members of the rose family come as both small herbs and as larger hedgerow shrubs. I have included some other wayside shrubs in this board too. To find out more about any of the species click on the link to the Nature of Dorset.
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Whilst scouring the blackberry bushes for interesting things to photograph it occurred to me just what a vital plant the common bramble is. In gardens they can be an unwelcome invasive weed and yet they are one of the mainstays of our native fauna. They are a member of the rose family the white or pink flowers in mid summer and are a key nectar source for countless insects and masses of butterflies gather round them. Bees, hoverflies and other flies and beetles can all be found on the…

Whilst scouring the blackberry bushes for interesting things to photograph it occurred to me just what a vital plant the common bramble is. In gardens they can be an unwelcome invasive weed and yet they are one of the mainstays of our native fauna. They are a member of the rose family the white or pink flowers in mid summer and are a key nectar source for countless insects and masses of butterflies gather round them. Bees, hoverflies and other flies and beetles can all be found on the…

Sweetbriar: smelling of roses | The Nature of Dorset

Sweetbriar: smelling of roses - a nature note from Dorset

After the purple and mauves of summer flowers we begin to see the predominant colour move back to yellow, a sure sign of high summer when Agrimony starts to come out. Agrimony is a common flower of our roadsides, hedgerows, grasslands, and scrubby areas where the soil is dry and chalky and there are plenty of areas like that in Dorset. Surprisingly, perhaps, this is a member of the rose family, each individual flower up the flower spike having five petals opening flat into a small rosette.

After the purple and mauves of summer flowers we begin to see the predominant colour move back to yellow, a sure sign of high summer when Agrimony starts to come out. Agrimony is a common flower of our roadsides, hedgerows, grasslands, and scrubby areas where the soil is dry and chalky and there are plenty of areas like that in Dorset. Surprisingly, perhaps, this is a member of the rose family, each individual flower up the flower spike having five petals opening flat into a small rosette.

Creeping Cinquefoil: foiled again | The Nature of Dorset

Creeping Cinquefoil: foiled again - a nature note from Dorset

Meadowsweet: a bit of a headache | The Nature of Dorset

Meadowsweet: a bit of a headache

Dog Rose: the witches briar | The Nature of Dorset

Dog Rose: the witches briar

Silverweed: leaves you in no doubt | Nature Notes from Dorset

Silverweed: leaves you in no doubt

Water Avens: cure all | The Nature of Dorset

Water Avens: cure all

Parsley-piert: breaking up stones | Nature Notes from Dorset

Identification of plants can be difficult at times but there are plants that are difficult to find before you actually even start to try and identify them! Parsley-piert (Aphanes arvensis) certainly falls in to this latter category.

In mid-June the Dorset hedgerows show the lovely flowers of the Dog Rose. They flower in June and July and once pollinated will turn in to the Rose Hips we all know, those wonderful, shiny red/orange seed fruits of the autumn. The Dog Rose can often be mistaken. There is also a Field Rose and a couple of wild briars which are very similar. The Dog Rose can have pink flowers as well as various lighter shades down to almost white. The Dog-rose is a climber whereas the Field Rose is more a…

In mid-June the Dorset hedgerows show the lovely flowers of the Dog Rose. They flower in June and July and once pollinated will turn in to the Rose Hips we all know, those wonderful, shiny red/orange seed fruits of the autumn. The Dog Rose can often be mistaken. There is also a Field Rose and a couple of wild briars which are very similar. The Dog Rose can have pink flowers as well as various lighter shades down to almost white. The Dog-rose is a climber whereas the Field Rose is more a…

"Ne'er cast a clout 'til May is out!" 'May is the country name for Hawthorn, not surprisingly because it blossoms in May. Unlike many flowers that blossom as the days lengthen (increased light of course) the Hawthorn can come in to flower any time in May, occasionally even as early as late April; it seems to depend on warmth. Hawthorn seems to flower early in warm a spring but later in poor years and I guess that is how it came to become a country weather guide.   Its fruits we know as haws.

"Ne'er cast a clout 'til May is out!" 'May is the country name for Hawthorn, not surprisingly because it blossoms in May. Unlike many flowers that blossom as the days lengthen (increased light of course) the Hawthorn can come in to flower any time in May, occasionally even as early as late April; it seems to depend on warmth. Hawthorn seems to flower early in warm a spring but later in poor years and I guess that is how it came to become a country weather guide. Its fruits we know as haws.

Field Rose the trailing rose | The Nature of Dorset

Field Rose the trailing rose

Salad Burnet: one for the pot | The Nature of Dorset

Salad Burnet: one for the pot - a nature note from Dorset

Marsh Cinquefoil:the purple marshlocks | The Nature of Dorset

Marsh Cinquefoil:the purple marshlocks - a nature note from Dorset

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Bramble: something for everyone | The Nature of Dorset

Bramble: something for everyone

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