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A Rare Color Photograph of a London Street in 1900 Incredibly clear and sharp.

London in 1901 - the End of the Victorian Era

Rare color photograph of a London Street in 1900 (via London in end of the Victorian Era. )This is Cheapside in the city of London. Statue is Sir Robert Peel.

A workman perched atop this shaky chimney, all that is left of the building, is chipping away with a hammer. London during the Blitz, 1940.

This is the photo that would trigger vertigo in most people! A workman perched atop this shaky chimney, all that is left of the building, is chipping away with a hammer. London during the Blitz, The question is: how did he climb up there?

Charlie Rouse was the last of the 'Watchmen' in London before the formation of the 'Peelers'.

Charlie Rouse was the last of the 'Watchmen' in London before the formation of the 'Peelers' who where the world's first police force. At one point there were night watchmen employed by the City of London.

London, 1877

Wall-workers (a system of cheap advertising whereby a wall is covered with an array of placards that are hung up in the morning and taken in at night). Photo by John Thomson for the magazine Street Life in London, 1876

The Victorians liked to have their social classes clearly defined. The working class was divided into three layers, the lowest being 'working men' or labourers, then the ‘intelligent artisan’, and above him the ‘educated working man’. In reality, things were not so tidily demarcated.  Photo: Glasgow slum, 1868

Photo: Glasgow slum, 1868 Later than what I'm writing and in Glasgow, but you get the basic idea.

Bethnal Green slum

London Slum Market Court, Kensington Who would have thought there once was a slum in an area that now has Harrods and Harvey Nichols in it?

One of the earliest photographs recording a London industry, this picture is one of a series taken by Geoffrey Bevington, a leather merchant and tanner from Bermondsey. Bermondsey was the capital's leather processing centre, and these pictures were displayed at the Bevington and Sons' stand at the 1862 International Exhibition.

Dickens's London: in pictures

One of the earliest photographs recording a London industry, this picture is one of a series taken by Geoffrey Bevington, a leather merchant and tanner from Bermondsey. Bermondsey was the capital's leather processing centre

The Great Smog of London of 1952: A police officer using flames at Marble Arch to direct the traffic in London smog in 1952

Pea souper that killed 12,000: So black you couldn't see the screen in cinemas. So suffocatingly lethal they ran out of coffins. How the Great Smog choked London 60 years ago this week

Anthony Sargeant remembers this -Lighting up the night: A police officer using flames at Marble Arch to direct the traffic in London smog in 1952

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