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The Towie Ball and other carved stone objects - Historically fired ceramic replicas of neolithic stone objects from Scotland. via Etsy. by EarthenMe

The Towie Ball and other carved stone objects - Historically fired ceramic replicas of neolithic stone objects from Scotland. by EarthenMe

Carved stone ball with spiral ornament, from Buchan, Aberdeenshire, 3200 - 2500 BC Date: 3200 - 2500 BC Material: Granite, red Collection place: Buchan, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, EUROPE

Carved stone ball with spiral ornament, from Buchan, Aberdeenshire, 3200 - 2500 BC Date: 3200 - 2500 BC Material: Granite, red Collection place: Buchan, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, EUROPE

Carved stone object from Skara Brae, Orkney, Scotland. Between 3400 and 2000 BC

Carved stone object from Skara Brae, Orkney, Scotland. Date: between 3400 - 2000 BC.

Pict with Drinking Horn This 9th century warrior of the Pictish tribe drinks from an eagle, the ancient symbol of power. From Invergowrie, Scotland and now in the Museum of Scotland, it is an unusually droll carving, certainly a caricature, perhaps in

Viking Drinking Horn Vessels and Accessories

Pict with Drinking Horn. This century warrior of the Pictish tribe drinks alcohol from an eagle, the ancient symbol of power.

The Mullamast Stone, from 500-600 in Ireland. There are 4 blade marks on the left side of the stone and 2 deep ones on top, suggesting that the stone was used as part of a “sword in the stone” kingship ritual. The perpetuation of the importance of the “sword in the stone,” which comes from Arthurian legend, demonstrates the continuity of Celtic rituals even after the arrival of Christianity in Ireland.

The Mullamast Stone, from Ireland. Four blade marks, left side; two deep ones on top, suggest stone's possible use in “sword in the stone” kingship ritual from Arthurian legend.

The Rollright Stones, Oxfordshire, England 77 limestones encircling secrets for…

The Rollright Stones, a complex of three Neolithic and Bronze Age megalithic monuments in Oxfordshire. Now known as The King’s Men, The King Stone and The Whispering Knights Photo copyright Angela Jayne Latham.

Gardoms Edge - cup and ring marked stone

Gardoms Edge - cup and ring marked stone East of Baslow, Derbyshire

The Hurlers - Cornwall's answer to Stonehenge!  Three fine late Neolithic or early Bronze Age stone circles arranged in a line, a grouping unique in England. Probably the best examples of ceremonial circles in the south west, they are traditionally reputed to be the remains of men petrified for playing 'hurling' on a Sunday.

Located in the scenic landscape of Bodmin Moor in Cornwall, the Hurlers date from about 1500 BC. They consist of three stone circles in a row and are named for a medieval legend that they are men turned to stone for hurling (a Celtic game) on Sunday.

Curiosidades: Los misteriosos mensajes de esta piedra de hace 3000 años que Reino Unido sepultó. Noticias de Alma, Corazón, Vida

Los misteriosos mensajes de esta piedra de hace 3000 años que Reino Unido sepultó

This week I will be opening up a trial trench to examine a prehistoric site, on the fringe of Glasgow, that was buried 51 years ago beneath a layer of soil and turf. The site is called the Cochn…

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