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The Concord Point Lighthouse Keeper's House in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Built in 1827, Concord Point is the northernmost lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay and stands 36 feet tall. The lighthouse was automated in 1920 and was decommissioned in 1975. The Friends of Concord Point Lighthouse was formed in 1979 to preserve and maintain the structure. Today, it is open for tours seasonally, April - October. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

The Concord Point Lighthouse Keeper's House in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Built in 1827, Concord Point is the northernmost lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay and stands 36 feet tall. The lighthouse was automated in 1920 and was decommissioned in 1975. The Friends of Concord Point Lighthouse was formed in 1979 to preserve and maintain the structure. Today, it is open for tours seasonally, April - October. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

Spread The History: The Concord Point Lighthouse in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Built in 1827 (along with the lighthouse keeper’s residence), it is the northernmost lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay and stands 36 feet tall. The lighthouse was automated in 1920 and was decommissioned in 1975. The Friends of Concord Point Lighthouse was formed in 1979 to preserve and maintain the structure. Today, it is open for tours seasonally, April - October. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

Spread The History: The Concord Point Lighthouse in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Built in 1827 (along with the lighthouse keeper’s residence), it is the northernmost lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay and stands 36 feet tall. The lighthouse was automated in 1920 and was decommissioned in 1975. The Friends of Concord Point Lighthouse was formed in 1979 to preserve and maintain the structure. Today, it is open for tours seasonally, April - October. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

The Concord Point Lighthouse in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Built in 1827 (along with the lighthouse keeper’s residence), it is the northernmost lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay and stands 36 feet tall. The lighthouse was automated in 1920 and was decommissioned in 1975. The Friends of Concord Point Lighthouse was formed in 1979 to preserve and maintain the structure. Today, it is open for tours seasonally, April - October. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

The Concord Point Lighthouse in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Built in 1827 (along with the lighthouse keeper’s residence), it is the northernmost lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay and stands 36 feet tall. The lighthouse was automated in 1920 and was decommissioned in 1975. The Friends of Concord Point Lighthouse was formed in 1979 to preserve and maintain the structure. Today, it is open for tours seasonally, April - October. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

Spread The History: Barnegat Lighthouse in Barnegat Light, New Jersey. The light was designed by Lieut. George G. Meade and lit on January 1, 1859. It stands 172 feet tall and has 217 steps to the watch room. It originally had a first order Fresnel lens which is now on display at the nearby Barnegat Light Museum. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

Spread The History: Barnegat Lighthouse in Barnegat Light, New Jersey. The light was designed by Lieut. George G. Meade and lit on January 1, 1859. It stands 172 feet tall and has 217 steps to the watch room. It originally had a first order Fresnel lens which is now on display at the nearby Barnegat Light Museum. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

#SpreadTheHistory The 1821 Champion School in Haddon Township, NJ, which housed schoolchildren until 1906. It was used for various civic purposes until 1965, when it was closed and slated for demolition. Thanks to a concerned resident, the demolition was halted. From 1988-1996, the building was restored. The site once again went unused but a new organization has been established to continue where the former group left off. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

#SpreadTheHistory The 1821 Champion School in Haddon Township, NJ, which housed schoolchildren until 1906. It was used for various civic purposes until 1965, when it was closed and slated for demolition. Thanks to a concerned resident, the demolition was halted. From 1988-1996, the building was restored. The site once again went unused but a new organization has been established to continue where the former group left off. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

This Place Matters: Waterloo Village in Byram Twp, NJ was about the half-way point along the Morris Canal. Most of the remaining buildings from this canal town date to the mid-19th century. After a decline in canal traffic, the village was abandoned by the 1930s. In the 1960s, volunteers began to restore the buildings and after a rebirth in the 1980s, the site once again declined due to problems with the non-profit running it. It is now open intermittently. More history…

A Village in Turmoil: Finding Hope for Waterloo Written by NJ Historian Just a few miles from present-day Interstate 80 in Sussex County.

This Place Matters: The circa 1740 Abraham Staats House in South Bound Brook, NJ. The house served as the headquarters of General von Steuben during the second Middlebrook Encampment in 1779. Discover more history at www.thehistorygirl.com

A Dutch Farmstead in South Bound Brook Written by NJ Historian Northern and central New Jersey have a rich Dutch heritage. The Dutch wer.

This Place Matters: The Warren County Historical Society, Belvidere, New Jersey. Founded in 1931, the Society maintains a museum in an 18148 Federal brick townhouse in the Belvidere Historic District for the exhibition of county artifacts and memorabilia as well as a resource center for public education and research including genealogy. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

This Place Matters: The Warren County Historical Society, Belvidere, New Jersey. Founded in 1931, the Society maintains a museum in an 18148 Federal brick townhouse in the Belvidere Historic District for the exhibition of county artifacts and memorabilia as well as a resource center for public education and research including genealogy. Discover more history @ www.thehistorygirl.com

This Place Matters: The Buccleuch Mansion in New Brunswick, NJ. The house was built between 1735 and 1739 by Anthony White, son-in-law of NJ Royal Governor Lewis Morris. During the Revolutionary War, it was occupied by British officers. George Washington and M de Lafayette also visited. In 1821 it was purchased by Col. Jos. Warren Scott and renamed Buccleuch in honor of his Scottish lineage. In 1911, the house was given to the City of New Brunswick. Discover more history…

This Place Matters: The Buccleuch Mansion in New Brunswick, NJ. The house was built between 1735 and 1739 by Anthony White, son-in-law of NJ Royal Governor Lewis Morris. During the Revolutionary War, it was occupied by British officers. George Washington and M de Lafayette also visited. In 1821 it was purchased by Col. Jos. Warren Scott and renamed Buccleuch in honor of his Scottish lineage. In 1911, the house was given to the City of New Brunswick. Discover more history…

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